folc

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See also: folc-

Friulian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin fulgur.

Noun[edit]

folc m

  1. thunderbolt

Synonyms[edit]


Irish[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Irish folc (heavy rain, wet weather).

Noun[edit]

folc f (genitive singular foilce, nominative plural folca)

  1. downpour, flood
Declension[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
  • folcmhar (pouring, torrential, adjective)

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old Irish folcaid (washes).

Verb[edit]

folc (present analytic folcann, future analytic folcfaidh, verbal noun folcadh, past participle folctha)

  1. to bathe
  2. to wash
  3. to immerse, submerge, drench
Conjugation[edit]
Derived terms[edit]

Mutation[edit]

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
folc fholc bhfolc
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Old English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *fulką (people). Related to Old Frisian folk (West Frisian folk), Old Saxon folk (Low German Volk), Old Dutch folk (Dutch volk), Old High German folk (German Volk), Old Norse fólk (Swedish folk).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

folc n

  1. a people, nation, tribe
    Wē þæt Folc
    We the People
    For þām Iudēisċan folce is Israēl þæt "Hālġe Land."
    For the Jewish people, Israel is the "Holy Land."
  2. crowd
  3. (in the singular or plural) people (multiple individuals)

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]


Old Saxon[edit]

Noun[edit]

folc n

  1. Alternative spelling of folk