folk

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English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English folk, from Old English folc, from Proto-Germanic *fulką (compare West Frisian folk, Dutch volk and German Volk), from *fulka- ("crowd, army"), possibly from Proto-Indo-European *pl̥h₁-go (compare Welsh ôl 'track', Lithuanian pulkas 'crowd', Old Church Slavonic plŭkŭ 'army division', Albanian plog 'barn, heap'; the Slavic and Lithuanian words may have been borrowed from Proto-Germanic instead). (Some have also attempted to link the word to Latin vulgus, populus or plebs.[1]) Related to follow.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

folk (not comparable)

  1. Of or pertaining to the inhabitants of a land, their culture, tradition, or history.
  2. Of or pertaining to common people as opposed to ruling classes or elites.

Noun[edit]

folk (plural folk or folks)

  1. (archaic) A grouping of smaller peoples or tribes as a nation.
  2. The inhabitants of a region especially the native inhabitants.
    • 1907, Race Prejudice, Jean Finot, p. 251:
      We thus arrive at a most unexpected imbroglio. The French have become a Germanic folk and the Germanic folk have become Gaulish!
  3. (plural only, plural: folks) One’s relatives especially one’s parents.
  4. (music) Folk music.
  5. (plural only) People in general.
    Young folk, old folk, everybody come, / To our little Sunday School and have a lot of fun.
    • 1922, Ben Travers, chapter 1, A Cuckoo in the Nest[1]:
      “[…] the awfully hearty sort of Christmas cards that people do send to other people that they don't know at all well. You know. The kind that have mottoes [] . And then, when you see [the senders], you probably find that they are the most melancholy old folk with malignant diseases. […]”
  6. (plural only) A particular group of people.

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/folk

Danish[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Norse fólk (people), folk, from Proto-Germanic *fulką.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /fɔlk/, [fʌlˀɡ̊]

Noun[edit]

folk n (singular definite folket, plural indefinite folk)

  1. people
  2. men
  3. crew
Inflection[edit]
Synonyms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From English folk (folk music).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /fɔvɡ/, [fʌwɡ̊]

Noun[edit]

folk c (singular definite folken, not used in plural form)

  1. folk music (contemporary music in the style of traditional folk music)

See also[edit]


Finnish[edit]

Noun[edit]

folk

  1. (music) folk, folk music

Declension[edit]


Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse fólk (people), folk, from Proto-Germanic *fulką.

Noun[edit]

folk n (definite singular folket; indefinite plural folk; definite plural folkene/folka; vocative folkens)

  1. a people
  2. people in general
  3. folk

Old Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *fulką, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *pl̥h₁-go.

Noun[edit]

folk n

  1. people, folk

Descendants[edit]


Old Frisian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *fulką.

Noun[edit]

folk n

  1. people, folk

Declension[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • West Frisian: folk

Old Saxon[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *fulką.

Noun[edit]

folk n

  1. people, folk

Declension[edit]


Scots[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old English folc, from Proto-Germanic *fulką.

Noun[edit]

folk (plural folks)

  1. people, folk

Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse fólk (people), folk, from Proto-Germanic *fulką.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

folk n

  1. (uncountable) people in general, humans
  2. a people, a nation; in compounds referring to local or national traditions (folklore), national institutions (folkhem) or international relations (folkrätt)

Declension[edit]

Compounds[edit]


West Frisian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Frisian folk, from Proto-Germanic *fulką.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

folk (plural folken)

  1. people, folk