folk

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See also: Folk, fólk, and fòlk

English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English folk, from Old English folc, from Proto-Germanic *fulką, from Proto-Indo-European *pl̥h₁-gós, from *pleh₁- (to fill).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

folk (not comparable)

  1. Of or pertaining to the inhabitants of a land, their culture, tradition, or history.
  2. Of or pertaining to common people as opposed to ruling classes or elites.
  3. (architecture) Of or related to local building materials and styles.
  4. Believed or transmitted by the common people; not academically correct or rigorous.
    folk psychology; folk linguistics

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

folk (plural folk or folks)

  1. (archaic) A grouping of smaller peoples or tribes as a nation.
    • J. R. Green
      The organization of each folk, as such, sprang mainly from war.
  2. The inhabitants of a region, especially the native inhabitants.
    • 1907, Race Prejudice, Jean Finot, page 251:
      We thus arrive at a most unexpected imbroglio. The French have become a Germanic folk and the Germanic folk have become Gaulish!
  3. (plural only, plural: folks) One’s relatives, especially one’s parents.
  4. (music) Folk music.
  5. (plural only) People in general.
    Young folk, old folk, everybody come, / To our little Sunday School and have a lot of fun.
    • 1922, Ben Travers, chapter 1, in A Cuckoo in the Nest[1]:
      “[…] the awfully hearty sort of Christmas cards that people do send to other people that they don't know at all well. You know. The kind that have mottoes [] . And then, when you see [the senders], you probably find that they are the most melancholy old folk with malignant diseases. […]”
  6. (plural only) A particular group of people.

Derived terms[edit]

Terms derived from the adjective or noun “folk”

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • "folk" in Raymond Williams, Keywords (revised), 1983, Fontana Press, page 136.

Danish[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Norse fólk, from Proto-Germanic *fulką.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /fɔlk/, [fʌlˀɡ̊]

Noun[edit]

folk n (singular definite folket, plural indefinite folk)

  1. people
  2. men
  3. crew
Declension[edit]
Synonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Further reading[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From English folk (folk music).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

folk c (singular definite folken, not used in plural form)

  1. folk music (contemporary music in the style of traditional folk music)

See also[edit]


Finnish[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈfolk/, [ˈfo̞lk]
  • Rhymes: -olk
  • Hyphenation: folk

Noun[edit]

folk

  1. (music) folk, folk music

Declension[edit]

Inflection of folk (Kotus type 5/risti, no gradation)
nominative folk folkit
genitive folkin folkien
partitive folkia folkeja
illative folkiin folkeihin
singular plural
nominative folk folkit
accusative nom. folk folkit
gen. folkin
genitive folkin folkien
partitive folkia folkeja
inessive folkissa folkeissa
elative folkista folkeista
illative folkiin folkeihin
adessive folkilla folkeilla
ablative folkilta folkeilta
allative folkille folkeille
essive folkina folkeina
translative folkiksi folkeiksi
instructive folkein
abessive folkitta folkeitta
comitative folkeineen
Possessive forms of folk (type risti)
possessor singular plural
1st person folkini folkimme
2nd person folkisi folkinne
3rd person folkinsa

Compounds[edit]


Middle English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old English folc.

Noun[edit]

folk (plural folk or folkes)

  1. folk
    • c. 1400, Geoffrey Chaucer, The Canterbury Tales, General Prologue, lines LINES:
      At nyght was come into that hostelrye / Wel nyne and twenty in a compaignye / Of sondry folk, by aventure yfalle / In felaweshipe, and pilgrimes were they alle,
      There came at nightfall to that hostelry / Some nine and twenty in a company / Of sundry folk who had chanced to fall / In fellowship, and pilgrims were they all

Descendants[edit]

  • English: folk
  • Scots: fowk

References[edit]


Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse fólk, folk, from Proto-Germanic *fulką.

Noun[edit]

folk n (definite singular folket, indefinite plural folk, definite plural folka or folkene)

  1. a people
  2. people in general
  3. folk

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse fólk, folk.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

folk n (definite singular folket, indefinite plural folk, definite plural folka)

  1. people
    Folk er rare.
    People are strange.
    Nordmennene er eit rart folk.
    The Norwegians are a strange people.

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]


Old Frisian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *fulką.

Noun[edit]

folk n

  1. people, folk

Inflection[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • North Frisian:
    Föhr-Amrum: folk
  • Saterland Frisian: Foulk
  • West Frisian: folk

Old Saxon[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *fulką.

Noun[edit]

folk n

  1. people, folk

Declension[edit]


Descendants[edit]

  • Middle Low German: volk
    • Low German:
      • German Low German:
        Hamburgisch: Volk
      • Westphalian:
        Ravensbergisch-Lippisch: Folk
        Sauerländisch: Volk
        Westmünsterländisch: Volk
    • Plautdietsch: Volkj

Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from English folk.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

folk m (uncountable)

  1. (music) folk music (contemporary music in traditional style)

Synonyms[edit]


Scots[edit]

Noun[edit]

folk (plural folks)

  1. Alternative spelling of fowk

Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

English folk

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

folk m (uncountable)

  1. folk (music)

Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse fólk, folk, from Proto-Germanic *fulką.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

folk n

  1. (uncountable) people in general, humans
  2. a people, a nation; in compounds referring to local or national traditions (folklore), national institutions (folkhem) or international relations (folkrätt)

Declension[edit]

Declension of folk 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative folk folket folk folken
Genitive folks folkets folks folkens

Derived terms[edit]


West Frisian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Frisian folk, from Proto-Germanic *fulką.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

folk n (plural folken, diminutive folkje)

  1. people, folk

Further reading[edit]

  • folk”, in Wurdboek fan de Fryske taal (in Dutch), 2011

Interjection[edit]

folk

  1. call at the door if anyone's home