populus

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See also: Populus

Latin[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

The origin is unknown; perhaps from Etruscan or from the root of pleō. See also plēbs.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

populus m ‎(genitive populī); second declension

  1. a people, nation
    • 100 BCE – 44 BCE, Julius Caesar, Commentarii de Bello Gallico 1.44
      Amicitiam populi Romani sibi ornamento et praesidio, non detrimento esse oportere, atque se hac spe petisse.
      That the friendship of the Roman people ought to prove to him an ornament and a safeguard, not a detriment; and that he sought it with that expectation.
  2. a community of people
    • 27 BCE – 25 BCE, Titus Livius, Ab urbe condita libri 26.1
      Ea tum cura maxime intentos habebat Romanos, non ab ira tantum, quae in nullam unquam ciuitatem iustior fuit, quam quod urbs tam nobilis ac potens, sicut defectione sua traxerat aliquot populos, ita recepta inclinatura rursus animos uidebatur ad ueteris imperii respectum.
      This concern in particular troubled the mindful Romans at the time, not so much because of anger, which has never been more justified against any other city, rather because a city so noble and powerful, in the same way that it had attracted the support of a number of communities by its revolt, was thought would again turn attention back towards respect for the previous government once recaptured.
  3. the people
Inflection[edit]

Second declension.

Case Singular Plural
nominative populus populī
genitive populī populōrum
dative populō populīs
accusative populum populōs
ablative populō populīs
vocative popule populī
Derived terms[edit]
Related terms[edit]
Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

The origin is unknown. Compare Ancient Greek πτελέα(pteléa, elm).

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

pōpulus f ‎(genitive pōpulī); second declension

  1. poplar tree
Inflection[edit]

Second declension.

Case Singular Plural
nominative pōpulus pōpulī
genitive pōpulī pōpulōrum
dative pōpulō pōpulīs
accusative pōpulum pōpulōs
ablative pōpulō pōpulīs
vocative pōpule pōpulī
Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  • populus in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • populus in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • POPULUS in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition, 1883–1887)
  • Félix Gaffiot (1934), Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Paris: Hachette, s.v.populus”.
  • Meissner, Carl; Auden, Henry William (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • the Republic: libera res publica, liber populus
    • (ambiguous) the plague breaks out in the city: pestilentia (not pestis) in urbem (populum) invadit
    • (ambiguous) to write a history of Rome: res populi Romani perscribere
    • (ambiguous) to have an appreciative audience: populum facilem, aequum habere
    • (ambiguous) to address a meeting of the people: verba facere apud populum, in contione
    • (ambiguous) the dregs of the people: faex populi, plebis, civitatis
    • (ambiguous) to summon an assembly of the people: convocare populi concilium and populum ad concilium
    • (ambiguous) to submit a formal proposition to the people: agere cum populo (Leg. 3. 4. 10)
    • (ambiguous) to propose a law in the popular assembly: legem ferre or simply ferre ad populum, ut...
    • (ambiguous) to formally propose a law to the people: legem rogare or rogare populum (cf. sect. XVI. 4, note Aulus Gellius...)
    • (ambiguous) popular favour; popularity: populi favor, gratia popularis
    • (ambiguous) to court popularity: gratiam populi quaerere
    • (ambiguous) public opinion: existimatio populi, hominum
    • (ambiguous) unpopularity: offensio populi, popularis
    • (ambiguous) unpopularity: offensa populi voluntas
    • (ambiguous) democracy: imperium populi or populare, civitas or res publica popularis
    • (ambiguous) to be a leading spirit of the popular cause: populi causam agere
    • (ambiguous) to enslave a free people: liberum populum servitute afficere
    • (ambiguous) to rob a people of its freedom: libertatem populo eripere
    • (ambiguous) to grant a people its independence: populum liberum esse, libertate uti, sui iuris esse pati
    • (ambiguous) to fail in one's candidature for the consulship: repulsam ferre consulatus (a populo) (Tusc. 5. 19. 54)
    • (ambiguous) the censors hold a census of the people: censores censent populum
    • (ambiguous) to appeal to the people: provocare ad populum (Liv. 2. 55)
    • (ambiguous) a matter is referred (for decision) from the senate to the people: a senatu res ad populum reicitur
    • (ambiguous) to be on friendly terms with the Roman people: in amicitia populi Romani esse (Liv. 22. 37)
    • (ambiguous) to reduce a country to subjection to oneself: populum in potestatem suam redigere (B. G. 2. 34)
    • (ambiguous) to reduce a country to subjection to oneself: populum in deditionem venire cogere
    • (ambiguous) to accept the submission of a people: populum in deditionem accipere
    • (ambiguous) to subjugate a nation: populum perdomare, subigere
    • (ambiguous) to make oneself master of a people, country: populum, terram suo imperio, suae potestati subicere (not sibi by itself)
    • (ambiguous) Asia was made subject to Rome: Asia populi Romani facta est
  • populus in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • populus in Ramminger, Johann (accessed 16 July 2016) Neulateinische Wortliste: Ein Wörterbuch des Lateinischen von Petrarca bis 1700[2], pre-publication website, 2005-2016
  • populus in William Smith et al., editor (1890) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, London: William Wayte. G. E. Marindin