foule

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See also: foulé

English[edit]

Adjective[edit]

foule (comparative more foule, superlative most foule)

  1. Obsolete form of foul.
    • 1590 Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, Book I, Canto I:
      The Patron of true Holinesse
      foule Errour doth defeate;
      Hypocrisie him to entrappe
       doth to his home entreate.

French[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle French foule (group of men, people collectively), alteration (due to Middle French foule (act of treading)) of Old French foulc (people, multitude, crowd, troop), from Vulgar Latin, from Frankish *folc, *fulc (crowd, multitude, people), from Proto-Germanic *fulką (collection or class of people, multitude; host of warriors), perhaps from Proto-Indo-European *pleh₁- (to fill). Cognate with Old High German folc (people collectively, nation), Old English folc (common people, troop, multitude). More at folk.

Noun[edit]

foule f (plural foules)

  1. crowd
  2. the thronging of a crowd
  3. a great number, multitude, mass; host

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle French foule (the act of milling clothes or hats) and fouler (to trample, mill, fordo, mistreat), from Old French foler (to crush, act wickedly), from Latin fullō (I trample, I full). More at full.

Noun[edit]

foule f (plural foules)

  1. the act or process of treading or milling
  2. oppression, vexation

Verb[edit]

foule

  1. first-person singular present indicative of fouler
  2. third-person singular present indicative of fouler
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of fouler
  4. first-person singular present subjunctive of fouler
  5. second-person singular imperative of fouler

Anagrams[edit]

Further reading[edit]


German[edit]

Verb[edit]

foule

  1. First-person singular present of foulen.
  2. First-person singular subjunctive I of foulen.
  3. Third-person singular subjunctive I of foulen.
  4. Imperative singular of foulen.

Norman[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French foulc (people, multitude, crowd, troop), from Vulgar Latin, from Frankish *folc, *fulc (crowd, multitude, people), from Proto-Germanic *fulką (collection or class of people, multitude; host of warriors), perhaps from Proto-Indo-European *pelə- (to fill).

Noun[edit]

foule f (plural foules)

  1. (Jersey) crowd

Synonyms[edit]