fader

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See also: Fader and fäder

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

fade +‎ -er

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

fader (plural faders)

  1. A device used to control sound volume.

Derived terms[edit]

Adjective[edit]

fader

  1. comparative form of fade: more fade

Anagrams[edit]


Danish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse faðir, from Proto-Germanic *fadēr, from Proto-Indo-European *ph₂tḗr.

Noun[edit]

fader c (singular definite faderen, plural indefinite fædre)

  1. (now formal) father
  2. A term of address for a Christian priest.

Inflection[edit]

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

See also[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Occitan [Term?]?

Verb[edit]

fader

  1. (reflexive, informal) to get stuck with

Conjugation[edit]

Further reading[edit]


German[edit]

Adjective[edit]

fader

  1. comparative degree of fade

Luxembourgish[edit]

Adjective[edit]

fader

  1. feminine dative of fad

Middle English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old English fæder, from Proto-Germanic *fadēr, from Proto-Indo-European *ph₂tḗr.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈfadər/, /ˈfaːdər/, /ˈfaðər/, /ˈfɛdər/, /ˈfɛːdər/

Noun[edit]

fader (plural faders or fadres, genitive fader or faders or fadres)

  1. A father; the male direct ancestor of someone or some creature.
  2. The indirect male ancestor of someone or some creature.
  3. The inventor or starter of an idea, nation or lineage.
  4. A spiritual superordinate, teacher, or leader:
    1. An individual who one offers confessions to; a confessor.
    2. One of the Church Fathers; an author of patristic writings.
  5. God/Jesus as father (as of Jesus, as in the Trinity, as inventor, or as leader).
  6. A polite appellation signifiying inferiority on behalf of the speaker.
  7. (rare) A secular superordinate, ruler, or leader.
  8. (rare) A Roman senator; a member of the Roman senate.

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]


Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse faðir, from Proto-Germanic *fadēr, from Proto-Indo-European *ph₂tḗr.

Noun[edit]

fader m (definite singular faderen, indefinite plural fedre, definite plural fedrene)

  1. father (often in a religious context)

Synonyms[edit]

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse faðir, from Proto-Germanic *fadēr, from Proto-Indo-European *ph₂tḗr.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

fader m (definite singular faderen, indefinite plural fedrar, definite plural fedrane)

  1. (archaic, poetic) father

Synonyms[edit]

References[edit]


Scots[edit]

Noun[edit]

fader (plural faders)

  1. Alternative form of faither

Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Swedish faþir, from Old Norse faðir, from Proto-Germanic *fadēr, from Proto-Indo-European *ph₂tḗr.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (file)

Noun[edit]

fader c

  1. a father
  2. a term of address for a Christian priest

Declension[edit]

Declension of fader 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative fader fadern fäder fäderna
Genitive faders faderns fäders fädernas

Synonyms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]