fader

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See also: Fader and fäder

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

fade +‎ -er

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

fader (plural faders)

  1. A device used to control sound volume.
  2. (computer graphics) A program or algorithm for fading out colors.

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Adjective[edit]

fader

  1. comparative form of fade: more fade

Anagrams[edit]


Danish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse faðir, from Proto-Germanic *fadēr, from Proto-Indo-European *ph₂tḗr.

Noun[edit]

fader c (singular definite faderen, plural indefinite fædre)

  1. (now formal) father
  2. A term of address for a Christian priest.

Inflection[edit]

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

See also[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Occitan fadar.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (file)

Verb[edit]

fader

  1. (reflexive, informal) to get stuck with

Conjugation[edit]

Further reading[edit]


German[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

fader

  1. comparative degree of fade

Adjective[edit]

fader

  1. inflection of fade:
    1. strong/mixed nominative masculine singular
    2. strong genitive/dative feminine singular
    3. strong genitive plural

Luxembourgish[edit]

Adjective[edit]

fader

  1. feminine dative of fad

Middle English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old English fæder, from Proto-Germanic *fadēr, from Proto-Indo-European *ph₂tḗr.

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈfa(ː)dər/, /ˈfaðər/, /ˈfɛ(ː)dər/

Noun[edit]

fader (plural faders or fadres, genitive fader or faders or fadres)

  1. A father (male direct ancestor of someone or some creature)
  2. An indirect male ancestor (of some being)
  3. The inventor or originator of an idea, nation or lineage.
  4. A spiritual superordinate, teacher, or leader:
    1. A confessor (individual who one offers confessions to);
    2. One of the Church Fathers; an author of patristic writings.
  5. God/Jesus as father (of Jesus, as inventor, or as leader).
  6. An appellation signifying the speaker's inferiority.
  7. (rare) A secular superordinate or leader.
  8. (rare) A member of the Roman senate.
Related terms[edit]
Descendants[edit]
References[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Verb[edit]

fader

  1. Alternative form of fadren

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse faðir, from Proto-Germanic *fadēr, from Proto-Indo-European *ph₂tḗr.

Noun[edit]

fader m (definite singular faderen, indefinite plural fedre, definite plural fedrene)

  1. father (often in a religious context)

Synonyms[edit]

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse faðir, from Proto-Germanic *fadēr, from Proto-Indo-European *ph₂tḗr.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

fader m (definite singular faderen, indefinite plural fedrar, definite plural fedrane)

  1. (archaic, poetic) father

Synonyms[edit]

References[edit]


Old Frisian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

fader m

  1. Alternative form of feder

References[edit]

  • Bremmer, Rolf H. (2009) An Introduction to Old Frisian: History, Grammar, Reader, Glossary, Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company, →ISBN, page 195

Scots[edit]

Noun[edit]

fader (plural faders)

  1. Alternative form of faither

Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Swedish faþir, from Old Norse faðir, from Proto-Germanic *fadēr, from Proto-Indo-European *ph₂tḗr.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈfɑːˌdɛr/, [ˈfɑːˌdær]
  • (file)

Noun[edit]

fader c

  1. a father
  2. a term of address for a Christian priest

Declension[edit]

Declension of fader 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative fader fadern fäder fäderna
Genitive faders faderns fäders fädernas

Synonyms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

Anagrams[edit]