feder

From Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to navigation Jump to search
See also: Feder

Breton[edit]

Noun[edit]

feder

  1. Aspirate mutation of peder.

Galician[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Galician-Portuguese feder, from Latin fetēre. Cognate with Portuguese feder and Spanish heder.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

feder (first-person singular present fedo, first-person singular preterite fedín, past participle fedido)
feder (first-person singular present fedo, first-person singular preterite fedim or fedi, past participle fedido, reintegrationist norm)

  1. to stink, reek
    • c. 1300, R. Martínez López, editor, General Estoria. Versión gallega del siglo XIV, Oviedo: Publicacións de Archivum, page 209:
      nẽgũa cousa do mũdo que viuese, nẽ viua fosse, nẽ peyxe, nẽ ave, nẽ al, nõse cria, nẽse pode aly criar, et esto por duas rrazões: aprimeyra por la terra quee queymada et morta, asegunda por la agoa quee manyna et caẽte, et fede
      nothing in the world that is or was alive, fish, bird, nothing, grow or can be raised there [Dead Sea]; and this is because of two reasons: the first, because the earth is burnt and dead, and the second, because the water is sterile and warm, and stinks

Conjugation[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • feder” in Dicionario de Dicionarios do galego medieval, SLI - ILGA 2006–2022.
  • fede” in Xavier Varela Barreiro & Xavier Gómez Guinovart: Corpus Xelmírez - Corpus lingüístico da Galicia medieval. SLI / Grupo TALG / ILG, 2006–2018.
  • feder” in Dicionario de Dicionarios da lingua galega, SLI - ILGA 2006–2013.
  • feder” in Tesouro informatizado da lingua galega. Santiago: ILG.
  • feder” in Álvarez, Rosario (coord.): Tesouro do léxico patrimonial galego e portugués, Santiago de Compostela: Instituto da Lingua Galega.

Middle English[edit]

Noun[edit]

feder (plural feders or federes)

  1. Alternative form of fader

Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Noun[edit]

feder m

  1. (non-standard since 1938) indefinite plural of far

Old English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

feder m

  1. Alternative form of fæder

Old Frisian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-West Germanic *fader.[1] Cognates include Old English fæder and Old Saxon fadar.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈfeder/, [ˈfæder]

Noun[edit]

feder m

  1. father

Descendants[edit]

  • North Frisian:
    Goesharde:
    Hoolmer: fooje
    Hoorninger: fååje
    Heligoland: Foor
    Sylt: Faađer
  • Saterland Frisian: Foar
  • West Frisian: faar

References[edit]

  1. ^ Bremmer, Rolf H. (2009) An Introduction to Old Frisian: History, Grammar, Reader, Glossary, Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company, →ISBN, page 29

Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Galician-Portuguese feder, from Latin fētēre, probably from Proto-Indo-European *dʰewh₂-.

Pronunciation[edit]

 
 
  • (Portugal) IPA(key): /fɨˈdeɾ/ [fɨˈðeɾ]
    • (Southern Portugal) IPA(key): /fɨˈde.ɾi/ [fɨˈðe.ɾi]

Verb[edit]

feder (first-person singular present fedo, first-person singular preterite fedi, past participle fedido)

  1. to stink (have a strong bad smell)

Conjugation[edit]

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Romani[edit]

Adjective[edit]

feder

  1. comparative degree of laćho

Adverb[edit]

feder

  1. comparative degree of laćhes

Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from German Feder.

Noun[edit]

féder m (Cyrillic spelling фе́дер)

  1. spring (elastic device)

Declension[edit]