turba

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See also: turbá

Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin turba.

Noun[edit]

turba f (plural turbes)

  1. crowd

Further reading[edit]


Estonian[edit]

Noun[edit]

turba

  1. genitive singular of turvas

Galician[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Borrowed from French tourbe, from Old High German zurf.

Noun[edit]

turba f (plural turbas)

  1. peat

Etymology 2[edit]

Borrowed from Latin turba.

Noun[edit]

turba f (plural turbas)

  1. mob

Hausa[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /túɽ.bàː/
    • (Standard Kano Hausa) IPA(key): [tɪ́ɽ.bàː]

Noun[edit]

turbā̀ f (possessed form turbàr̃)

  1. path, track, lane

Italian[edit]

Verb[edit]

turba

  1. third-person singular present indicative of turbare
  2. second-person singular imperative of turbare

Etymology[edit]

From Latin turba.

Noun[edit]

turba f (plural turbe)

  1. crowd, throng
  2. mob

Anagrams[edit]


Latin[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Probably from Ancient Greek τύρβη (túrbē, tumult, disorder, turmoil), from Proto-Indo-European *(s)twerH-, *(s)turH- (to rotate, swirl, twirl, move around); related to English storm.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

turba f (genitive turbae); first declension

  1. stir, disturbance, tumult, uproar, trouble, confusion
  2. mob, crowd, throng
  3. multitude
Declension[edit]

First-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative turba turbae
Genitive turbae turbārum
Dative turbae turbīs
Accusative turbam turbās
Ablative turbā turbīs
Vocative turba turbae
Synonyms[edit]
Related terms[edit]
Descendants[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

turbā

  1. second-person singular present active imperative of turbō

References[edit]

  • turba in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • turba in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • turba in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition, 1883–1887)
  • turba in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • the lictors clear the way: lictores summovent turbam (Liv. 4. 50)
  • turba in Ramminger, Johann (accessed 16 July 2016) Neulateinische Wortliste: Ein Wörterbuch des Lateinischen von Petrarca bis 1700[2], pre-publication website, 2005-2016
  • turba in William Smith, editor (1854, 1857) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography, volume 1 & 2, London: Walton and Maberly
  • turba in Richard Stillwell et al., editor (1976) The Princeton Encyclopedia of Classical Sites, Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press

Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin turba.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

turba f (plural turbas)

  1. crowd, throng
  2. mob

Quotations[edit]

For quotations using this term, see Citations:turba.


Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin turbāre, present active infinitive of turbō.

Verb[edit]

a turba (third-person singular present turbă, past participle turbat1st conj.

  1. to rage, go mad

Conjugation[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈtuɾba/, [ˈt̪uɾ.β̞a]
  • (file)

Etymology 1[edit]

Borrowed from French tourbe, from Old High German zurf.

Noun[edit]

turba f (plural turbas)

  1. peat
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Borrowed from Latin turba.

Noun[edit]

turba f (plural turbas)

  1. mob

Etymology 3[edit]

Form of turbar.

Verb[edit]

turba

  1. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present indicative form of turbar.
  2. Informal second-person singular () affirmative imperative form of turbar.