pax

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See also: Pax

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English pax, from Latin pax (peace). Doublet of peace. See peace. As school slang, originally used at Winchester College, Hampshire in the United Kingdom.

Noun[edit]

pax

  1. (Christianity) A painted, stamped or carved tablet with a representation of Christ or the Virgin Mary, which was kissed by the priest during the Mass ("kiss of peace") and then passed to other officiating clergy and the congregation to be kissed. See also osculatory.
  2. (Britain, dated, school slang) Friendship; truce.
    • 1950, C. S. Lewis, The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe
      "I say, Lu! I'm sorry I didn't believe you. I see now you were right all along. Do come out. Make it Pax."
    to make pax with someone
    to be good pax (i.e., good friends)
  3. (Christianity) The kiss of peace.
  4. (Christianity) A crucifix, a tablet with the image of Christ on the cross upon it, or a reliquary.

Interjection[edit]

pax

  1. (UK, dated, school slang) A cry for peace or truce in children's games.
    Synonyms: fainites, (Scotland, obsolete) barlafumble
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Abbreviation of passenger. X is an abbreviation marker as in DX, TX and canx.

Noun[edit]

pax (plural pax)

  1. (informal, usually in the plural) A passenger; passengers.
  2. (informal, usually in the plural, by extension, hospitality industry) A guest (at an event or function).
  3. (Singapore, by extension) A restaurant guest, when counting. Person.
    $30 per pax
Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Italic *pāks, Proto-Indo-European *péh₂ḱ-s (peace), from the root *peh₂ḱ- (to join, to attach).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

pāx f (genitive pācis); third declension

  1. peace
    Sperō ut pācem habeant semper.
    I hope that they may always have peace.
    Donec, infecta pāce, ad arma desilirent.
    While, as peace was broken, they came down with arms.
  2. (poetic) rest, quiet, ease
    Synonyms: otium, tranquillitas, serenitas, quies
    Antonyms: seditio, tumultus, turba, inquies, concursus
  3. (transferred sense) grace (esp. from the gods)
  4. (transferred sense) leave, good leave (permission)
  5. (ecclesiastical) peace, harmony
    Requiēscat in pāce.
    May he/she rest in peace.

Declension[edit]

Third-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative pāx pācēs
Genitive pācis pācum
Dative pācī pācibus
Accusative pācem pācēs
Ablative pāce pācibus
Vocative pāx pācēs

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Balkan Romance:
    • Romanian: pace
  • Gallo-Italic:
    • Emilian:
    • Ligurian:
    • Lombard: paas
    • Piedmontese: pas
    • Romagnol:
  • Gallo-Romance:
  • Ibero-Romance:
  • Italo-Dalmatian:
  • Rhaeto-Romance:
  • Sardinian:
  • Venetian: paxe
  • Early borrowings:
  • Modern borrowings:

Interjection[edit]

pāx

  1. enough talking! silence! hush! peace!
    Synonyms: pāx sit rēbus, tacē, tacē tū, fac taceās, dēsine, st, linguae temperā!

References[edit]

  • pax”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • pax”, in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • pax in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • pax in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré latin-français, Hachette
  • Carl Meißner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • to treat with some one about peace: agere cum aliquo de pace
    • to propose terms of peace: pacis condiciones ferre (not proponere)
    • to dictate the terms of peace to some one: pacis condiciones dare, dicere alicui (Liv. 29. 12)
    • to accept the terms of the peace: pacis condiciones accipere, subire (opp. repudiare, respuere)
    • peace is concluded on condition that..: pax convenit in eam condicionem, ut...
    • deep peace: summa pax
    • allow me to say: pace tua dixerim or dicere liceat
    • (ambiguous) to bring about a peace: pacem conciliare (Fam. 10. 27)
    • (ambiguous) to make peace with some one: pacem facere cum aliquo
    • (ambiguous) to break the peace: pacem dirimere, frangere
  • pax”, in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • pax”, in William Smith, editor (1848) A Dictionary of Greek Biography and Mythology, London: John Murray

Middle English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin pāx.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

pax

  1. pax (tablet with carved religious image)
    Synonym: paxbrede
  2. (rare) kiss of peace

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]


Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Since 1880 from Latin pāx (peace).

Pronunciation[edit]

Interjection[edit]

pax

  1. (children’s language) dibs (to claim a stake to something); used as a noun with the verbs “get, receive” and ha “have”, or as a verb; att paxa.
    Pax för soffan! - “I have (first) dibs on the sofa!”
    Jag fick pax på framsätet! - “I got dibs on shotgun!”
    Jag har paxat fåtöljen - I "have dibbed" the armchair

Synonyms[edit]