wode

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See also: wodę and wódę

English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English wode, from Old English wōd (mad, raging, enraged, insane, senseless, blasphemous), from Proto-Germanic *wōdaz (compare Middle Dutch woet > Dutch woede, Old High German wuot > German Wut (fury), Old Norse óðr, Gothic 𐍅𐍉𐌳𐍃 (wōds, demonically possessed)), from Proto-Indo-European *weh₂t-ós, from *weh₂t- (excited, possessed) (compare Latin vātēs (seer, prophet), Old Irish fáith (seer), Welsh gwawd (song)).

Alternative forms[edit]

Adjective[edit]

wode (comparative woder, superlative wodest)

  1. (obsolete) Mad, crazy, insane, possessed, rabid, furious, frantic.
    • a. 1588, Jasper Heywood, quoted in James Petite Andews, The History of Great Britain, published 1806
      My hair stode up, I waxed wode, my synewes all did shake / And, as the fury had me vext, my teeth began to quake.

Etymology 2[edit]

See woad.

Noun[edit]

wode (uncountable)

  1. Obsolete spelling of woad

Anagrams[edit]


Middle English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old English wōd, from Proto-West Germanic *wōd, from Proto-Germanic *wōdaz, from Proto-Indo-European *weh₂tós.

Noun[edit]

wode (uncountable)

  1. madness, insanity, an overmastering emotion, rage, fury
    c. 1400, Laud Troy Book:
    When thei saw hir for wode so wilde Thei did lede hir ... With-oute the toun [] And stoned hir to dethe.'
    (please add an English translation of this quote)

Verb[edit]

wode

  1. To be or go mad; be or go out of one's mind; behave wildly; be frenzied; go out of control.
  2. to be or become furious, enraged.
Conjugation[edit]

Adverb[edit]

wode

  1. frantically
  2. ferociously, fiercely
  3. intensely, furiously
  4. furiously enraged, irate, angry
    He was wod wroth and wold do Thomas ... to deth. — Mirk's Festial: A Collection of Homilies by (Can we date this quote by Johannes Mirkus and provide title, author’s full name, and other details?)
    When þe wale kyng wist, he wex wode wroth.(Can we date this quote by Wars of Alexander and provide title, author’s full name, and other details?)

Adjective[edit]

wode

  1. mad, insane, possessed, furious, frantic, mentally deranged, of unsound mind, out of one's mind.
  2. rabid
  3. wild, not tamed
Derived terms[edit]
Descendants[edit]
  • English: wode, wood
  • Scots: wod, wode, wud, wude, wuid
References[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old English wudu, from Proto-West Germanic *widu, from Proto-Germanic *widuz; see wood.

Noun[edit]

wode

  1. wood (material).
Descendants[edit]
References[edit]

Verb[edit]

wode

  1. To hunt.
  2. To take to the woods; hide oneself in the woods (also reflexive: ben woded).
Conjugation[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
References[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

Verb[edit]

wode

  1. Alternative form of waden

Yola[edit]

Verb[edit]

wode

  1. Alternative form of woode

References[edit]

  • Jacob Poole (1867), William Barnes, editor, A Glossary, With some Pieces of Verse, of the old Dialect of the English Colony in the Baronies of Forth and Bargy, County of Wexford, Ireland, London: J. Russell Smith, page 78