complex

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to navigation Jump to search
See also: complèx

English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Etymology[edit]

From French complexe, from Latin complexus, past participle of complectī (to entwine, encircle, compass, infold), from com- (together) and plectere (to weave, braid). See complect. Doublet of complexus.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective
  • (UK) IPA(key): /kəmˈplɛks/, /ˈkɒm.plɛks/
  • (file)
  • (US) enPR: kəmplĕks, kŏm'plĕks; IPA(key): /kəmˈplɛks/, /ˈkɑmplɛks/
  • (file)
Noun

Adjective[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

complex (comparative complexer or more complex, superlative complexest or most complex)

  1. Made up of multiple parts; composite; not simple.
    a complex being; a complex idea
  2. Not simple, easy, or straightforward; complicated.
    • (Can we date this quote by Whewell and provide title, author’s full name, and other details?)
      When the actual motions of the heavens are calculated in the best possible way, the process is difficult and complex.
  3. (mathematics) Of a number, of the form a + bi, where a and b are real numbers and i is a square root of −1.
    complex function
  4. (geometry) A curve, polygon or other figure that crosses or intersects itself.

Synonyms[edit]

Antonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Noun[edit]

complex (plural complexes or complices)

  1. A problem. (clarification of this definition is needed)
  2. A network of interconnected systems.
  3. A collection of buildings with a common purpose, such as a university or military base.
  4. An assemblage of related things; a collection.
    • (Can we date this quote by South and provide title, author’s full name, and other details?)
      This parable of the wedding supper comprehends in it the whole complex of all the blessings and privileges exhibited by the gospel.
    1. An organized cluster of thunderstorms.
    2. (taxonomy) A group of closely related species, often distinguished only with difficulty by traditional morphological methods.
      • 2015 November 26, Mosè Manni et al., “Relevant genetic differentiation among Brazilian populations of Anastrepha fraterculus (Diptera, Tephritidae)”, in ZooKeys, volume 540, DOI:10.3897/zookeys.540.6713:
        Since then, a good deal of research has documented and concluded that the nominal species A. fraterculus actually comprises an unresolved complex of cryptic species.
  5. (psychoanalysis) An abnormal mental condition caused by repressed emotions.
  6. (informal, by extension) A vehement, often excessive psychological dislike or fear of a particular thing.
    Jim has a real complex about working for a woman boss.
  7. (chemistry) A structure consisting of a central atom or molecule weakly connected to surrounding atoms or molecules.
    • 2013 September-October, Katie L. Burke, “In the News”, in American Scientist:
      Oxygen levels on Earth skyrocketed 2.4 billion years ago, when cyanobacteria evolved photosynthesis: [] . The evolutionary precursor of photosynthesis is still under debate, and a new study sheds light. The critical component of the photosynthetic system is the “water-oxidizing complex”, made up of manganese atoms and a calcium atom.
  8. (mathematics) A complex number.
    • 1996, Barry Simon, Representations of Finite and Compact Groups, page 50:
      The interesting aspect here is that U3 is irreducible, even though all irreps over the complexes are one-dimensional because ℤ4 is abelian.

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Verb[edit]

complex (third-person singular simple present complexes, present participle complexing, simple past and past participle complexed)

  1. (chemistry, intransitive) To form a complex with another substance
  2. (transitive) To complicate.

Translations[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin complexus.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

complex (feminine complexa, masculine plural complexos, feminine plural complexes)

  1. complex
    Antonyms: simple, senzill

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Noun[edit]

complex m (plural complexos)

  1. complex (clarification of this definition is needed)

Further reading[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from French complexe or German komplex, from Latin complexus.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

complex (comparative complexer, superlative meest complex or complext)

  1. complex (composite)
  2. complex (complicated)
  3. (mathematics) complex (containing an imaginary component or involving imaginary numbers)

Inflection[edit]

Inflection of complex
uninflected complex
inflected complexe
comparative complexer
positive comparative superlative
predicative/adverbial complex complexer het complext
het complexte
indefinite m./f. sing. complexe complexere complexte
n. sing. complex complexer complexte
plural complexe complexere complexte
definite complexe complexere complexte
partitive complex complexers

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Indonesian: kompleks

Noun[edit]

complex n (plural complexen, diminutive complexje n)

  1. complex (collection of buildings or facilities with a common purpose)
  2. (psychoanalysis) complex (abnormal mental state caused by repression)

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]


Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French complexe, from Latin complexus.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

complex m or n (feminine singular complexă, masculine plural complecși, feminine and neuter plural complexe)

  1. complex

Declension[edit]

Antonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]