complice

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to navigation Jump to search
See also: cómplice

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French

Noun[edit]

complice (plural complices)

  1. (obsolete) An accomplice; a supporter.
    • c. 1597, William Shakespeare, Henry IV, Part 2, Act I, Scene 1,[1]
      The lives of all your loving complices
      Lean on your health; the which, if you give o’er
      To stormy passion, must perforce decay.
    • 1676, Andrew Marvell, Mr. Smirke; or, The Divine Mode, London, p. 11,[2]
      Our Saviour was accused that he would Destroy the Temple. The first Martyr Steven was stoned as a Complice.
    • 1759, David Hume, The History of England under the House of Tudor, London: A. Millar, Volume 1, Chapter 2, p. 340,[3]
      [] a bill confirming the attainder of Somerset and his complices was also rejected by the commons, tho’ it had passed the upper house.

References[edit]

  • Oxford English Dictionary, 2nd edition, United Kingdom: Oxford University Press, 1989, OCLC 1071858051

French[edit]

Adjective[edit]

complice (plural complices)

  1. kindred, close

Noun[edit]

complice m or f (plural complices)

  1. accomplice

Further reading[edit]


Italian[edit]

Noun[edit]

complice m or f (plural complici)

  1. accomplice