fyr

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See also: fyr-

Danish[edit]

Danish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia da

Etymology 1[edit]

Maybe a contraction of Middle Low German firburs (unemployed craftsman).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /fyːr/, [fyɐ̯ˀ]

Noun[edit]

fyr c (singular definite fyren, plural indefinite fyre)

  1. chap, bloke, guy
  2. (colloquial) boyfriend
Inflection[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle Low German vūr, from Old Saxon fiur, from Proto-Germanic *fōr, Proto-Indo-European *péh₂ur (bonfire).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /fyːr/, [fyɐ̯ˀ]

Noun[edit]

fyr n (singular definite fyret, plural indefinite fyr)

  1. boiler
  2. fire
  3. light
  4. lighthouse
  5. radio beacon
Inflection[edit]
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

From Old Norse fura.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

fyr c (singular definite fyrren, plural indefinite fyrre)

  1. pine
  2. pinewood, deal
Inflection[edit]

Etymology 4[edit]

See fyre.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /fyːr/, [fyɐ̯ˀ]

Verb[edit]

fyr

  1. imperative of fyre

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Probably a shortening of the Low German firburs, meaning a full-fledged craftsman who is unemployed.

Noun[edit]

fyr m (definite singular fyren, indefinite plural fyrer, definite plural fyrene)

  1. guy, bloke
    Han er en merkelig fyrhe is a weird guy
    Sjekk den fyren dercheck out that guy (over there)

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old Norse fýrr, cognate with its Nordic equivalents, Old Frisian fiur, Old Saxon fiur, Dutch vuur, Old High German fiur, German Feuer and English fire. Believed to ultimately stem from Proto-Germanic *fōr, and Proto-Indo-European *péh₂ur, which also is the origin of Greek πυρ (pyr).

Noun[edit]

fyr m (definite singular fyren, indefinite plural fyrer, definite plural fyrene)

  1. the presence of fire.
    Å sette fyr på noeto set something on fire
    Skogen tok fyrthe forest caught fire
    Fyr!fire! (when using firearms)
    Har du fyr?Got a light? (for cigarettes or similar)
  2. furnace room, boiler room, stokehold
    Jeg har jobbet i fyren hele dagen
    I've been working in the boiler the whole day
Related terms[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

As for Etymology 2.

Noun[edit]

fyr n (definite singular fyret, indefinite plural fyr, definite plural fyra or fyrene)

Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no
  1. lighthouse, beacon
    Fyret har stått der siden 1800-tallet
    the lighthouse has been there since the 1800s

Derived terms[edit]

Synonyms[edit]

Etymology 4[edit]

Verb[edit]

fyr

  1. imperative of fyre

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Probably a shortening of the Low German firburs, meaning an unemployed craftsman.

Noun[edit]

fyr m (definite singular fyren, indefinite plural fyrar, definite plural fyrane)

  1. guy, bloke
    • 1863, Ivar Aasen, "Høgferd":
      Det er den største Gleda, ein liten Fyr kann faa, at han slepp upp i Høgdi, so Folk maa honom sjaa []
      It is the greatest joy a little guy can have, to make it into the heights, so that people can see him []

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old Norse fýrr, cognate with its Nordic equivalents, Old Frisian fiur, Old Saxon fiur, Dutch vuur, Old High German fiur, German Feuer and English fire. Believed to ultimately stem from Proto-Germanic *fōr, and Proto-Indo-European *péh₂ur, which also is the origin of Greek πυρ (pyr).

Noun[edit]

fyr m (definite singular fyren, indefinite plural fyrar, definite plural fyrane)

  1. fire
  2. light (means of starting a fire)
    Har du fyr?
    Do you have a light?

Etymology 3[edit]

As for Etymology 2.

Noun[edit]

fyr m (definite singular fyren, indefinite plural fyrar, definite plural fyrane)
or
fyr n (definite singular fyret, indefinite plural fyr, definite plural fyra)

Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nn
  1. lighthouse, beacon

Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 4[edit]

Verb[edit]

fyr

  1. imperative of fyra

References[edit]


Old English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From dialectal Proto-Germanic *fuïr, from *fōr, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *péh₂ur. Cognate with Old Frisian fiūr, Old Saxon fiur, Dutch vuur, Old High German fiur (German Feuer), Old Norse fúrr, fýrr, Gothic 𐍆𐍉𐌽 (fon). The Indo-European root is also the source of Greek πῦρ.

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

fȳr n (nominative plural fȳra or fȳre)

  1. fire
    Ðæs fȳres ġecynd is hāt and drīe.
    Fire’s nature is hot and dry.
Inflection[edit]
Descendants[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Comparative of feor.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adverb[edit]

fyr

  1. further

Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse fúrr, fýr, fýrir, funi, from Proto-Germanic *fōr, from Proto-Indo-European *ph₂wṓr, earlier *péh₂wōr, collective of *péh₂ur.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

fyr c

  1. a lighthouse
  2. fire
  3. (dated) a guy

Declension[edit]

Declension of fyr 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative fyr fyren fyrar fyrarna
Genitive fyrs fyrens fyrars fyrarnas

Related terms[edit]

See also[edit]


Welsh[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

fyr

  1. Soft mutation of byr (short).

Mutation[edit]

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
byr fyr myr unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.