project

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin prōiectus, perfect passive participle of prōiciō (throw forth, extend; expel).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun
Verb

Noun[edit]

project (plural projects)

  1. A planned endeavor, usually with a specific goal and accomplished in several steps or stages.
  2. (usually in the plural, US) An urban low-income housing building.
    Projects like Pruitt-Igoe were considered irreparably dangerous and demolished.
    • 1996, “Stakes is High”, in Stakes Is High, performed by De La Soul:
      Experiments when needles and skin connect / No wonder where we live is called the projects
    • 2012, “Money Trees”, in Good Kid, M.A.A.D City, performed by Kendrick Lamar ft. Jay Rock:
      Imagine rock up in them projects / Where them niggas pick your pockets
  3. (dated) An idle scheme; an impracticable design.
    a man given to projects
  4. (US, sports) a raw recruit who the team hopes will improve greatly with coaching; a long shot diamond in the rough
  5. (obsolete) A projectile.
  6. (obsolete) A projection.

Hyponyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Japanese: プロジェクト (purojekuto)
  • Korean: 프로젝트 (peurojekteu)
  • Scottish Gaelic: pròiseact

Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

project (third-person singular simple present projects, present participle projecting, simple past and past participle projected)

  1. (intransitive) To extend beyond a surface.
    Synonyms: extend, jut, protrude, stick out
  2. (transitive) To cast (an image or shadow) upon a surface; to throw or cast forward; to shoot forth.
    Synonyms: cast, throw
  3. (transitive) To extend (a protrusion or appendage) outward.
    Synonyms: extend, jut, jut out
  4. (transitive) To make plans for; to forecast.
    Synonyms: forecast, foresee, foretell
    The CEO is projecting the completion of the acquisition by April 2007.
    • 1834, L[etitia] E[lizabeth] L[andon], chapter XXI, in Francesca Carrara. [], volume III, London: Richard Bentley, [], (successor to Henry Colburn), →OCLC, page 172:
      To form a strict alliance between the cabinets of Paris and London—which meant, that he should influence both,—to induce Charles to marry the loveliest of his nieces, Hortense—thus making a common interest between them, were now the great objects with the Cardinal; and the present visit was of his projecting.
    • 1667, John Milton, “Book II”, in Paradise Lost. [], London: [] [Samuel Simmons], [], →OCLC; republished as Paradise Lost in Ten Books: [], London: Basil Montagu Pickering [], 1873, →OCLC:
      projecting Peace and Warr?
  5. (transitive, reflexive) To present (oneself), to convey a certain impression, usually in a good way.
    • 1946, Dr. Ralph S. Banay, The Milwaukee Journal, Is Modern Woman a Failure[1]:
      It is difficult to gauge the exact point at which women stop trying to fool men and really begin to deceive themselves, but an objective analyst cannot escape the conclusion (1) that partly from a natural device inherent in the species, women deliberately project upon actual or potential suitors an impression of themselves that is not an accurate picture of their total nature, and (2) that few women ever are privileged to see themselves as they really are.
  6. (transitive, psychology, psychoanalysis) To assume qualities or mindsets in others based on one's own personality.
  7. (cartography) To change the projection (or coordinate system) of spatial data with another projection.
  8. (geometry) To draw straight lines from a fixed point through every point of any body or figure, and let these fall upon a surface so as to form the points of a new figure.
  9. (neuroanatomy) (of a neuron or group of neurons) to have axon(s) extending to and therefore able to influence a remote location
  10. (transitive) To cause (one's voice or words) to be heard at a great distance.
    to project one's voice
  11. (intransitive) To speak or sing in such a way that one can be heard at a great distance.
    • 2016, Sam Esmail, Courtney Looney, Mr. Robot: Red Wheelbarrow: eps1.91_redwheelbarr0w.txt, Abrams Books, New York City, →ISBN:
      You would think that topic coulda put me to sleep, but HE can really project when HE wants to.

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

See also[edit]

Further reading[edit]

Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Ultimately from Latin prōiectum. This etymology is incomplete. You can help Wiktionary by elaborating on the origins of this term.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

project n (plural projecten, diminutive projectje n)

  1. project (planned endeavor)

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]