champ

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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See also: Champ, čhamp, Champ., and champ'

English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

See champion

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

champ (plural champs)

  1. Clipping of champion.
  2. (informal) buddy, sport, mate (as a term of address)
    Whatcha doing, champ?
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Uncertain, probably imitative

champ (etymology 2, noun)

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

champ (usually uncountable, plural champs)

  1. (Ireland) a meal of mashed potatoes and scallions

Verb[edit]

champ (third-person singular simple present champs, present participle champing, simple past and past participle champed)

  1. (transitive, intransitive) to bite or chew, especially noisily or impatiently.
Translations[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

From champagne by shortening.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

champ (uncountable)

  1. (informal) champagne
    • 1990, Ann Heller, "Prom Nights Often Offer Students Primer On Fine Dining", Dayton Daily News, 6 April 1990:
      "They're dressed up very elegantly and it's nice they have a glass of champ, even if it's non-alcoholic," Reif says.
    • 2009, The Lonely Island (featuring T-Pain), "I'm on a Boat", Incredibad:
      We're drinkin' Santana champ, 'cause it's so crisp
    • 2010, Tara Palmer-Tomkinson, Inheritance, Pan Books (2010), →ISBN, unnumbered page:
      'Glass of champ?' she called, skipping into the kitchen.

Etymology 4[edit]

Borrowed from French champ (field). Doublet of campus and camp.

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

champ (plural champs)

  1. (architecture, obsolete or rare) the field or ground on which carving appears in relief
  2. (heraldry, obsolete or rare) the field of a shield

References[edit]

  • Webster's Seventh New Collegiate Dictionary, Springfield, Massachusetts, G.&C. Merriam Co., 1967

French[edit]

French Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia fr
champ

Etymology[edit]

From Middle French champ, from Old French champ, inherited from Latin campus (field), from Proto-Indo-European *kh₂emp- (to bend, curve). Doublet of camp.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

champ m (plural champs)

  1. field in its various senses, including:
    1. a wide open space
    2. an area of study
    3. (mathematics) a vector field, tensor field, or scalar field (but not a commutative ring with identity for which every nonzero element has a multiplicative inverse, cf. corps)
    4. (heraldry) the background of a shield's design

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • English: champ

Related terms[edit]

External links[edit]


Old French[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin campus.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

champ m (oblique plural chans, nominative singular chans, nominative plural champ)

  1. field
  2. (by extension) battlefield

Descendants[edit]


Scots[edit]

Etymology[edit]

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): [tʃam], [tʃamp], [dʒam], [dʒamp]

Verb[edit]

champ (third-person singular present champs, present participle champin, past champit, past participle champit)

  1. to mash, crush, pound
  2. to chew voraciously

Derived terms[edit]

  • champer (an implement for mashing or crushing etc., a pestle)
  • champers (mashed potatoes)

Noun[edit]

champ (plural champs)

  1. (geography) a stretch of ground trodden into a miry state, a quagmire

Welsh[edit]

Noun[edit]

champ

  1. Aspirate mutation of camp.

Mutation[edit]

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
camp gamp nghamp champ
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.