conserve

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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See also: conservé

English[edit]

English Wikipedia has articles on:
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Etymology[edit]

From Middle English conserven, from Old French conserver, from Latin conservare (to keep, preserve), from com- (intensive prefix) + servo (keep watch, maintain). See also observe.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun
  • enPR: kŏn'sû(r)v, IPA(key): /ˈkɒnsɜː(ɹ)v/
    • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɒnsɜː(ɹ)v
Verb

Noun[edit]

conserve (plural conserves)

  1. Wilderness where human development is prohibited.
  2. A jam or thick syrup made from fruit.
    • 1709 August 22 (Gregorian calendar), Isaac Bickerstaff [et al., pseudonyms; Richard Steele et al.], “Thursday, August 11, 1709”, in The Tatler, number 53; republished in [Richard Steele], editor, The Tatler, [], volume I, London stereotype edition, London: I. Walker and Co.; [], 1822, OCLC 69947324:
      I shall [] study broths, plasters, and conserves, till from a fine lady I become a notable woman.
  3. (obsolete) A medicinal confection made of freshly gathered vegetable substances mixed with finely powdered refined sugar.
  4. (obsolete) A conservatory.
    • c. 1700, John Evelyn, Elysium Britannicum
      water [] alwayes placed in the Conserve

Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

conserve (third-person singular simple present conserves, present participle conserving, simple past and past participle conserved)

  1. (transitive) To save for later use, sometimes by the use of a preservative.
    to conserve fruits with sugar
    • 1721, John Strype, Ecclesiastical Memorials
      the amity which [] they meant to conserve and maintain with the emperor
  2. (transitive) To protect an environment, heritage, etc.
    • 2021 December 15, Robin Leleux, “Awards honour the best restoration projects: The Network Rail Community Award: Saltash and Stow”, in RAIL, number 946, page 58:
      Two entrants shared this award for their work on two quite different stations, but with the same purpose of bringing a redundant station building back into use for the benefit of the community, with the added result of conserving an historic building. Saltash Town Council bought Saltash station building after it had become very decrepit and 'an eyesore' - such that it was nearly pulled down to make way for housing.
  3. (physics, chemistry, intransitive) To remain unchanged during a process

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Anagrams[edit]


French[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

conserve f (plural conserves)

  1. canned food, preserve

Derived terms[edit]

Verb[edit]

conserve

  1. inflection of conserver:
    1. first/third-person singular present indicative/subjunctive
    2. second-person singular imperative

Further reading[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Italian[edit]

Noun[edit]

conserve f

  1. plural of conserva

Anagrams[edit]


Latin[edit]

Noun[edit]

cōnserve

  1. vocative singular of cōnservus

Portuguese[edit]

Verb[edit]

conserve

  1. first-person singular present subjunctive of conservar
  2. third-person singular present subjunctive of conservar
  3. first-person singular imperative of conservar
  4. third-person singular imperative of conservar

Spanish[edit]

Verb[edit]

conserve

  1. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of conservar.
  2. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of conservar.
  3. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of conservar.
  4. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of conservar.