Welsh

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English[edit]

Wiktionary
Welsh edition of Wiktionary
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Etymology[edit]

Old English wīlisc, wylisc ‎(foreigner; Celt), from Proto-Germanic *walhiskaz ‎(Celt; later Roman), from *walhaz ‎(Celt) (compare Old English wealh), from the name of the Gaulish tribe, the Volcae (recorded only in Latin contexts). Historically the tribe's name has been linked to an animal, likely Gaulish *wolco- ‎(wolf), as Caesar described the Celts having fought with huge dogs, in turn from Proto-Indo-European *wĺ̥kʷos.[1]

This word was borrowed from Germanic into Slavic (compare Old Church Slavonic влахъ ‎(vlachŭ, Vlachs, Romanians), Byzantine Greek Βλάχος ‎(Blákhos)).

Compare Walloon, walnut, Vlach, Walach.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

Welsh ‎(not comparable)

  1. (now historical) (Native) British; pertaining to the Celtic peoples who inhabited much of Britain before the Roman occupation. [from 5thc.]
    • 1985, Michael Wood, In Search of the Trojan War:
      The Tudors, it was argued, were of Welsh or ancient British descent.
  2. (obsolete) Foreign; non-native. [10th-16thc.]
    • 1485, Thomas Malory, Le Morte Darthur, Book XVIII, chapter xxiij:
      By my hede sayd syr Gareth I wylle ryde vnto my lord sir launcelot for to helpe hym / [] / ye shalle not soo said sir Bors by my counceylle / onles that ye were desguysed / ye shalle see me dysguysed said syre Gareth / and there with al he aspyed a wallysshe knyghte where he was to repose hym
  3. Of or pertaining to Wales. [from 11thc.]
  4. Of or pertaining to the Celtic language of Wales. [from 16thc.]
  5. Designating plants or animals from or associated with Wales. (See Derived terms.) [from 17thc.]

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Proper noun[edit]

Welsh

  1. The Welsh language. [from 10th c.]
    • 1832, Queen Victoria, journal, 6 Aug 1832:
      9 minutes to 2. We just stopped to have our horses' mouths washed, and there all people spoke welsh.
  2. (collectively) The people of Wales. [from 11th c.]
  3. A surname for someone who was a Welshman or a Celt.
  4. A breed of pig, kept mainly for bacon.

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

See also[edit]

External links[edit]


References[edit]

  1. ^ Caesar, Commentarii de Bello Gallico

Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

Welsh n ‎(uncountable)

  1. Welsh, the language.

Synonyms[edit]

Adjective[edit]

Welsh ‎(not comparable)

  1. Welsh

Declension[edit]

Inflection of Welsh
uninflected Welsh
inflected Welshe
comparative
positive
predicative/adverbial Welsh
indefinite m./f. sing. Welshe
n. sing. Welsh
plural Welshe
definite Welshe
partitive Welsh

Synonyms[edit]