bacon

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See also: bacón, Bacon, and bà con

English[edit]

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 Bacon (disambiguation) on Wikipedia

Wikipedia

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English bacon ‎(meat from the back and sides of a pig), from Anglo-Norman bacon, bacun ‎(ham, flitch, strip of lard), from Old Low Frankish *bakō ‎(ham, flitch), from Proto-Germanic *bakô, *bakkô ‎(back), from Proto-Indo-European *bhAg- ‎(back, buttocks). Cognate with Old High German bahho, bacho ‎(back, ham, side of bacon) (compare Alemannic German Bache, Bachen), Old Saxon baco ‎(back), Dutch bake ‎(side of bacon, ham), Old English bæc ‎(back). More at back.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

bacon ‎(usually uncountable, plural bacons)

  1. Cured meat from the sides, belly, or back of a pig.
    • 2006, Joanna Pruess, Seduced by Bacon, The Lyons Press, ISBN 1592288510, pages 93:
      They fried the fish with bacon and were astonished, for no fish had ever seemed so delicious before.
    • 2009 March 31, Casey, Laura, “Piggin' out on bacon at S.F.'s BaconCamp”, San Jose Mercury News, retrieved on 2010-10-19:
      For us the pig's the means, while bacon is the end / Providing gustatory heights to which we can ascend.
    • 2009 August 12, Abraham, Lisa, “Bacon comes home - Old favorite tastes even better when you do the curing yourself”, Akron Beacon Journal, page D1:
      Bacon is something that everybody is familiar with and most people grew up eating. It has a comfort aspect to it and a familiarity. It's also got an addictive aspect to it - that sweet and salty combination of flavors. And it's probably just a little bit unhealthy for you. When you get to have bacon, it's exciting and something you look forward to.
  2. Thin slices of the above in long strips.
  3. A term of endearment.
    my sweet bacon
  4. A saucisse.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Wilhelm to this entry?)
  5. (slang, derogatory) The police.
    Run! It's the bacon!

Synonyms[edit]

  • (Cut of meat from a pig): ham, pork

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

Translations[edit]

See also[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

1899, "thin, smoked lard", from English bacon, from Middle English bacon ‎(meat from the back and sides of a pig), from Old French bacon, bacun ‎(ham, strip of lard), from Frankish *bakkō, from Proto-Germanic *bakō, *baką, *bakaz ‎(back), from Proto-Indo-European *bhAg- ‎(back, buttocks). Cognate with Old High German bahho, bacho ‎(Alemannic German Bache, Bachen, back, ham, side of bacon), Old Saxon baco ‎(back), Dutch bake ‎(side of bacon, ham), Old English bæc ‎(back). More at back.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /be.kɔn/, /be.kœn/
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Noun[edit]

bacon m ‎(uncountable)

  1. bacon

External links[edit]


Italian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowing from English bacon

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

bacon m ‎(invariable)

  1. bacon

Synonyms[edit]


Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia no

Etymology[edit]

Borrowing from English bacon

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

bacon n ‎(definite singular baconet)

  1. bacon

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia nn

Etymology[edit]

Borrowing from English bacon

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

bacon n ‎(definite singular baconet)

  1. bacon

References[edit]


Old French[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

bacon m ‎(oblique plural bacons, nominative singular bacons, nominative plural bacon)

  1. pig; swine; hog
  2. ham, or any meat from a pig

Descendants[edit]


Portuguese[edit]

Noun[edit]

bacon m (plural bacons)

  1. bacon (cut of meat)

Synonyms[edit]