hock

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See also: Hock and höck

English[edit]

English Wikipedia has articles on:
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Etymology 1[edit]

Clipping of hockamore, from the name of the German town of Hochheim am Main.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

hock (countable and uncountable, plural hocks)

  1. A Rhenish wine, of a light yellow color, either sparkling or still, from the Hochheim region; often applied to all Rhenish wines.
    Synonym: Hochheimer

See also[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English hoch, hough, hocke, from Old English hōh, from Proto-Germanic *hanhaz (compare West Frisian hakke, Dutch hak, German Low German Hack), from Proto-Indo-European *kenk (compare Lithuanian kìnka (leg, thigh, knee-cap), kenklė̃ (knee-cap), Sanskrit कङ्काल (kaṅkāla, skeleton)).

Noun[edit]

The hock of a horse (circled).

hock (plural hocks)

  1. The tarsal joint of a digitigrade quadruped, such as a horse, pig or dog.
  2. Meat from that part of a food animal.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

hock (third-person singular simple present hocks, present participle hocking, simple past and past participle hocked)

  1. (transitive) To disable by cutting the tendons of the hock; to hamstring; to hough.
Synonyms[edit]
Hypernyms[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

From the phrase in hock, circa 1855-60, from Dutch hok (hutch, hovel, jail, pen, doghouse). [1] Compare also Middle English hukken (to sell; peddle; sell at auction), see huck.

Verb[edit]

hock (third-person singular simple present hocks, present participle hocking, simple past and past participle hocked)

  1. (transitive, colloquial) To leave with a pawnbroker as security for a loan.
Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

hock (uncountable)

  1. Pawn, obligation as collateral for a loan.
    He needed $750 to get his guitar out of hock at the pawnshop.
    • 2012 April 25, Patty Murphy, “Business bulletin”, in Associated Press, page 10A:
      But Ford Motor Co. needs another agency, either Standard & Poor's or Moody's, to make the same upgrade before it can get its blue oval logo, factories and other assets out of hock.
  2. Debt.
    They were in hock to the bank for $35 million.
  3. Installment purchase.
    • 2007, Tara Hanks, The Mmm Girl: Marilyn Monroe, by Herself, page 28:
      Later, Uncle Doc bought a couch on hock, then a bed.
  4. Prison.
Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Douglas Harper (2001–2021) , “hock”, in Online Etymology Dictionary.

Etymology 4[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

From Yiddish האַק(hak), imperative singular form of האַקן(hakn, to knock), from the idiomatic expression האַק מיר נישט קיין טשײַניק(hak mir nisht keyn tshaynik, don't knock a teakettle at me)

Alternative forms[edit]

Verb[edit]

hock (third-person singular simple present hocks, present participle hocking, simple past and past participle hocked)

  1. (US) To bother; to pester; to annoy incessantly

Etymology 5[edit]

Variant of hack; from Middle English hacken, hakken, from Old English *haccian ("to hack"; attested in tōhaccian (to hack to pieces)), from Proto-Germanic *hakkōną (to chop; hoe; hew), from Proto-Indo-European *keg-, *keng- (to be sharp; peg; hook; handle).

Verb[edit]

hock (third-person singular simple present hocks, present participle hocking, simple past and past participle hocked)

  1. To cough heavily, especially causing uvular frication.
    1. To cough while the vomit reflex is triggered; to gag.
    2. To produce mucus from coughing or clearing one's throat.

Derived terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]