hoh

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See also: Hoh, höh, and HOH

Alemannic German[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old High German hāben, from Proto-Germanic *habjaną. Compare German haben, Dutch hebben, West Frisian hawwe, English have, Icelandic hafa.

Verb[edit]

hoh

  1. (Carcoforo) to have

References[edit]

  • “hoh” in Patuzzi, Umberto, ed., (2013) Ünsarne Börtar [Our Words], Luserna, Italy: Comitato unitario delle linguistiche storiche germaniche in Italia / Einheitskomitee der historischen deutschen Sprachinseln in Italien

Jakaltek[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Mayan *jooj.

Noun[edit]

hoh

  1. crow

References[edit]

  • Church, Clarence; Church, Katherine (1955) Vocabulario castellano-jacalteco, jacalteco-castellano[1] (in Spanish), Guatemala C. A.: Instituto Lingüístico de Verano, pages 17; 21

Old High German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *hauhaz (compare Old Dutch hōh, Old English hēah, Old Dutch hōh, Old Norse hár), from Proto-Indo-European *kewk-, a suffixed form of *kew-. The Indo-European root is also the source of Sanskrit कुच (kuca, female breast), Lithuanian kaukas, Russian куча (kuča).

For more Germanic cognates, see Proto-Germanic *hauhaz.

Adjective[edit]

hōh

  1. high

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Middle High German: hōch,

Old Saxon[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *hauhaz (compare Old High German hōh, Old English hēah, Old Dutch hōh, Old Norse hár), from Proto-Indo-European *kewk-, a suffixed form of *kew-. The Indo-European root is also the source of Sanskrit कुच (kuca, female breast), Lithuanian kaukas, Russian куча (kuča).

For more Germanic cognates: see Proto-Germanic *hauhaz.

Adjective[edit]

hōh

  1. high

Declension[edit]


Descendants[edit]