spurn

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See also: Spurn

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English spurnen, spornen, from Old English spurnan (to strike against, kick, spurn, reject; stumble)[1], from Proto-Germanic *spurnaną (to tread, kick, knock out), from Proto-Indo-European *sper-, *sperw- (to twitch, push, fidget, be quick). Cognate with Scots spurn (to strike, push, kick), German spornen (to spur on), Icelandic sporna, spyrna (to kick), Latin spernō (despise, distain, scorn). Related to spur and spread.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

spurn (third-person singular simple present spurns, present participle spurning, simple past and past participle spurned)

  1. (transitive, intransitive) To reject disdainfully; contemn; scorn.
    • c. 1596–1599, William Shakespeare, “The Second Part of Henry the Fourth, []”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358, [Act V, scene ii]:
      to spurn at your most royal image
    • c. 1603–1606, William Shakespeare, “The Tragedie of King Lear”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358, [Act V, scene iii]:
      What safe and nicely I might well delay / By rule of knighthood, I disdain and spurn.
    • (Can we date this quote by John Locke and provide title, author's full name, and other details?)
      Domestics will pay a more cheerful service when they find themselves not spurned because fortune has laid them at their master's feet.
    • 2020 February 25, Christopher de Bellaigue, “The end of farming?”, in The Guardian[1]:
      Although the term “rewilding” – meaning an approach to conservation that allows nature a free rein – has been in currency since 1990, many traditional landowners and gamekeepers continue to spurn both the term and the idea behind it.
  2. (transitive) To reject something by pushing it away with the foot.
  3. (transitive) To waste; fail to make the most of (an opportunity)
    • 2011 September 28, Tom Rostance, “Arsenal 2 - 1 Olympiakos”, in BBC Sport[2]:
      Marouane Chamakh then spurned a great chance to kill the game off when he ran onto Andrey Arshavin's lofted through ball but shanked his shot horribly across the face of goal.
  4. (intransitive, obsolete) To kick or toss up the heels.
    • (Can we date this quote by Chaucer and provide title, author's full name, and other details?)
      The miller spurned at a stone.
    • (Can we date this quote by Gay and provide title, author's full name, and other details?)
      The drunken chairman in the kennel spurns.

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

spurn (plural spurns)

  1. An act of spurning; a scornful rejection.
  2. A kick; a blow with the foot.
    • 1644, John Milton, The Doctrine or Discipline of Divorce:
      What defence can properly be used in such a despicable encounter as this but either the slap or the spurn?
  3. (obsolete) Disdainful rejection; contemptuous treatment.
  4. (mining) A body of coal left to sustain an overhanging mass.

Translations[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ spurn” in Douglas Harper, Online Etymology Dictionary, 2001–2020.

Icelandic[edit]

Noun[edit]

spurn f (genitive singular spurnar, nominative plural spurnir)

  1. Used in set phrases
    Ég hafði spurnir af Ara.
    I received news of Ari.

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]


Middle English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

A back-formation from spurnen.

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

spurn

  1. (rare) A stumbling; a collapse.
  2. (rare) A strike or blow using one's feet.
Descendants[edit]
  • English: spurn
References[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old English spurnan.

Verb[edit]

spurn

  1. Alternative form of spurnen