dos

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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See also: DOS, DoS, dós, dōs, do's, -dos, d'os, and d'ô

English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

dos

  1. plural of do
    • 1916, Eleanor H. Porter, chapter VIII, in Just David[1]:
      With the coming of Monday arrived a new life for David—a curious life full of "don'ts" and "dos." David wondered sometimes why all the pleasant things were "don'ts" and all the unpleasant ones "dos."

Etymology 2[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

dos

  1. (music) plural of do
    • 2020, Jennifer Snodgrass, Teaching Music Theory, Oxford University Press, →ISBN, page 212:
      In functional harmonic progression, three “Dos” in a row within the Do-Ti test indicate chord changes that can only be this descending third pattern.

Anagrams[edit]


Aragonese[edit]

Aragonese cardinal numbers
 <  1 2 3  > 
    Cardinal : dos

Etymology[edit]

From Latin duos, accusative of duo.

Numeral[edit]

dos

  1. two

Asturian[edit]

Asturian cardinal numbers
 <  1 2 3  > 
    Cardinal : dos
    Ordinal : segundu

Etymology[edit]

From Latin duōs, accusative form of duo.

Numeral[edit]

dos (indeclinable)

  1. two

Catalan[edit]

Catalan cardinal numbers
 <  1 2 3  > 
    Cardinal : dos
    Ordinal : segon
    Multiplier : doble
Catalan Wikipedia article on dos

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Occitan dos, from Latin duōs, accusative form of duo (two), from Proto-Italic *duō, from Proto-Indo-European *dwóh₁.

Pronunciation[edit]

Numeral[edit]

dos m (feminine dues)

  1. two
Usage notes[edit]
  • Catalan cardinal numbers may be used as masculine or feminine adjectives, except un/una (1), dos/dues (2), cents/centes (100s) and its compounds. When used as nouns, Catalan cardinal numbers are treated as masculine singular nouns in most contexts, but in expressions involving time such as la una i trenta (1:30) or les dues (two o'clock), they are feminine because the feminine noun hora has been elided.
Derived terms[edit]

Noun[edit]

dos m (plural dosos)

  1. two
  2. (castells) torre
  3. (castells) One of a pair of castellers in the pom de dalt, who form the third-highest level of the castell

Etymology 2[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

dos

  1. plural of do

Etymology 3[edit]

From Old Catalan dos, from Old Occitan, from Vulgar Latin *dossum, from Latin dorsum (back). Compare dors, a borrowed doublet.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

dos m (plural dossos)

  1. Archaic form of dors.
Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Middle French dos (back).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /dɔs/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: dos
  • Rhymes: -ɔs

Noun[edit]

dos m (plural dossen, diminutive dosje n)

  1. garb, clothing, especially extravagant or unusual clothes
  2. pelt, fur
  3. patch of hair, especially one's headhair

Derived terms[edit]


Extremaduran[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Akin to Spanish, from Latin duo.

Numeral[edit]

dos

  1. two

Fala[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Portuguese dos, from de + os.

Preposition[edit]

dos m pl (singular dos, feminine da, feminine plural das)

  1. contraction of de (of) + os (the)
    • 2000, Domingo Frades Gaspar, Vamus a falal: Notas pâ coñocel y platical en nosa fala, Editora regional da Extremadura, Theme I, Chapter 1: Lengua Española:
      Esti términu Mañegu, o mais pequenu dos tres, formaba parti, con términus de Vilamel i Trevellu, da pruvincia de Salamanca hasta o anu 1833 []
      This San Martinese locality, the smallest of the three, formed, along with the Vilamen and Trevejo localities, the Salamanca province until the year 1833 []

French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French dos, from Latin dorsum (through a Vulgar Latin *dossum). Compare Romansch dies, Catalan dors, Italian dosso, and Romanian dos.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

dos m (plural dos)

  1. (anatomy) back (of a person)
  2. (in the plural) backs (of persons)
  3. (swimming) backstroke
  4. (book) spine

Antonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Galician[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From contraction of preposition de (of, from) + masculine plural definite article os (the). Akin to Portuguese dos (de + os).

Pronunciation[edit]

Contraction[edit]

dos m pl (masculine do, feminine da, feminine plural das)

  1. of the; from the

Further reading[edit]


Indonesian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): [ˈd̪ɔs]
  • Hyphenation: dos

Noun[edit]

dos (first-person possessive dosku, second-person possessive dosmu, third-person possessive dosnya)

  1. nonstandard form of dus.

Irish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Irish doss (bush, thicket, tree).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

dos m (genitive singular dois, nominative plural dosanna)

  1. tuft

Declension[edit]

Mutation[edit]

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
dos dhos ndos
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further reading[edit]


Kabuverdianu[edit]

Kabuverdianu cardinal numbers
 <  1 2 3  > 
    Cardinal : dos

Etymology[edit]

From Portuguese dois.

Numeral[edit]

dos

  1. two (2)

Kristang[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Portuguese dois, from Latin duo.

Numeral[edit]

dos

  1. two

Ladino[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin duōs, accusative of duo.

Numeral[edit]

dos (Latin spelling, Hebrew spelling דוס‎)

  1. two

Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Italic *dōtis, from Proto-Indo-European *déh₃tis, from *deh₃- (give). Doublet of dosis. Cognate with Ancient Greek δόσις (dósis), Sanskrit दिति (díti).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

dōs f (genitive dōtis); third declension

  1. dowry
  2. gift, endowment, talent

Declension[edit]

Third-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative dōs dōtēs
Genitive dōtis dōtum
dōtium
Dative dōtī dōtibus
Accusative dōtem dōtēs
Ablative dōte dōtibus
Vocative dōs dōtēs

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Catalan: dot
  • Dalmatian: duauta
  • French: dot
  • Galician: dote
  • Italian: dota, dote
  • Mozarabic: addóte
  • Portuguese: dote
  • Spanish: dote

References[edit]

  • dos in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • dos in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • dos in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • dos in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • Carl Meißner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[2], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • to give a dowry to one's daughter: dotem filiae dare
  • dos in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • dos in William Smith et al., editor (1890) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, London: William Wayte. G. E. Marindin

Latvian[edit]

Verb[edit]

dos

  1. 3rd person singular future indicative form of dot
  2. 3rd person plural future indicative form of dot


Malay[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From English dose

Noun[edit]

dos (plural dos-dos, informal 1st possessive dosku, impolite 2nd possessive dosmu, 3rd possessive dosnya)

  1. dose

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Dutch doos, from Middle Dutch dose (since 1361), probably from Latin dosis (the small box in which a dose of medication was given).

Noun[edit]

dos (plural dos-dos, informal 1st possessive dosku, impolite 2nd possessive dosmu, 3rd possessive dosnya)

  1. (Indonesia) carton, cardboard box

Alternative forms[edit]

  • dus (Indonesia)

Further reading[edit]


Middle Welsh[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

dos

  1. second-person singular imperative of mynet

Mutation[edit]

Middle Welsh mutation
Radical Soft Nasal Aspirate
dos ðos nos unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Norman[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French dos, from Vulgar Latin *dossum, from Latin dorsum.

Noun[edit]

dos m (plural dos)

  1. (Jersey, anatomy) back (of a person)

Northern Sami[edit]

Determiner[edit]

dōs

  1. locative singular of dōt

Occitan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin duōs, accusative form of duo.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (file)

Numeral[edit]

dos m (feminine doas)

  1. two

Further reading[edit]

  • Joan de Cantalausa (2006) Diccionari general occitan a partir dels parlars lengadocians, 2 edition, →ISBN, page 360.

Old French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Vulgar Latin *dossum, from Latin dorsum.

Noun[edit]

dos m (oblique plural dos, nominative singular dos, nominative plural dos)

  1. (anatomy) back

Descendants[edit]

  • French: dos
  • Norman: dos (Jersey)
  • Walloon: dos

Old Occitan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin duos, accusative of duo.

Numeral[edit]

dos

  1. two (2)

Descendants[edit]


Papiamentu[edit]

Papiamentu cardinal numbers
 <  1 2 3  > 
    Cardinal : dos

Etymology[edit]

From Portuguese dois and Spanish dos and Kabuverdianu dos.

Numeral[edit]

dos

  1. two (2)

Portuguese[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

 
  • IPA(key): (Brazil including São Paulo) /dus/, [dus]
    • IPA(key): (Rio) /duʃ/, [duʃ]
  • IPA(key): (Portugal) /duʃ/, [duʃ]

Contraction[edit]

dos

  1. Contraction of de os (pertaining or relating to the).; of the; from the (masculine plural)
    dos Santos
    of the Saints

Quotations[edit]

For quotations using this term, see Citations:do.

See also[edit]

  • do (singular form)
  • das (feminine form)
  • da (singular feminine form)

Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Vulgar Latin *dossum, from Latin dorsum. Compare French dos and Romansch dies.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

dos n (plural dosuri)

  1. back
    Synonym: spate
  2. bottom, behind, buttocks
    Synonym: fund
  3. reverse
  4. backside, rear
  5. tails (on a coin)

Declension[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Spanish numbers (edit)
20
 ←  1 2 3  → 
    Cardinal: dos
    Ordinal: segundo
    Multiplier: doble
    Fractional: mitad

Etymology[edit]

From Latin duōs, accusative of duo, from Proto-Italic *duō, from Proto-Indo-European *dwóh₁. Cognates include Ancient Greek δύο (dúo), Old English twa (English two), Persian دو‎.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈdos/, [ˈd̪os]
  • Hyphenation: dos
  • (file)

Numeral[edit]

dos

  1. two

Derived terms[edit]

See also[edit]

Playing cards in Spanish · cartas (layout · text)
Ace of spades.svg 2 of spades.svg 3 of spades.svg 4 of spades.svg 5 of spades.svg 6 of spades.svg 7 of spades.svg
as dos tres cuatro cinco seis siete
8 of spades.svg 9 of spades.svg 10 of spades.svg Jack of spades2.svg Queen of spades2.svg King of spades2.svg Joker black 02.svg
ocho nueve diez sota reina rey comodín

Further reading[edit]


Swedish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

dos c

  1. dose (of medication)

Declension[edit]

Declension of dos 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative dos dosen doser doserna
Genitive dos dosens dosers dosernas

Tagalog[edit]

Tagalog cardinal numbers
 <  1 2 3  > 
    Cardinal : dos
    Ordinal : ika-dos

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Spanish dos (two).

Pronunciation[edit]

Numeral[edit]

dos

  1. two
    Synonym: dalawa
    • 2017, Curtis McFarland; Komisyon sa Wikang Filipino, Diksyunaryong Monolingwal sa Filipino: (Monolingual Dictionary in Filipino)[3]:
      Ang dos na bilang ay suwerte para sa kanya.
      The number two is lucky for him.

Derived terms[edit]

Noun[edit]

dos

  1. (card games) two (card)

Walloon[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French dos, from Vulgar Latin *dossum, from Latin dorsum.

Noun[edit]

dos m

  1. (anatomy) back

Welsh[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

dos

  1. (North Wales) second-person singular imperative of mynd

Synonyms[edit]

  • cer (South Wales)

Mutation[edit]

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
dos ddos nos unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.