dos

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See also: DoS and DOS

English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

dos pl ‎(plural only)

  1. plural of do

Anagrams[edit]


Aragonese[edit]

Numeral[edit]

dos

  1. (cardinal) two

Asturian[edit]

Asturian cardinal numbers
 <  1 2 3  > 
    Cardinal : dos
    Ordinal : segundu

Etymology[edit]

From Latin duo.

Numeral[edit]

dos (indeclinable)

  1. (cardinal) two

Catalan[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Latin duōs, accusative form of duo ‎(two).

Numeral[edit]

Catalan cardinal numbers
 <  1 2 3  > 
    Cardinal : dos
    Ordinal : segon
    Multiplier : doble
Catalan Wikipedia article on dos

dos m ‎(feminine dues)

  1. (cardinal) two

Usage notes[edit]

  • Catalan cardinal numbers may be used as masculine or feminine adjectives, except un/una ‎(1), dos/dues ‎(2), cents/centes ‎(100s) and its compounds. When used as nouns, Catalan cardinal numbers are treated as masculine singular nouns in most contexts, but in expressions involving time such as la una i trenta (1:30) or les dues (two o'clock), they are feminine because the feminine noun hora has been elided.
Derived terms[edit]

Noun[edit]

dos m ‎(plural dosos)

  1. two

Etymology 2[edit]

Noun[edit]

dos

  1. plural of do

Etymology 3[edit]

From Latin dorsum ‎(back).

Noun[edit]

dos m ‎(plural dossos)

  1. Archaic form of dors.
Derived terms[edit]

Fala[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Portuguese dos, from de + os.

Preposition[edit]

dos m pl ‎(singular dos, feminine da, feminine plural das)

  1. contraction of de ‎(of) + os ‎(the)
    • 2000, Domingo Frades Gaspar, Vamus a falal: Notas pâ coñocel y platical en nosa fala, Editora regional da Extremadura, Theme I, Chapter 1: Lengua Española:
      Esti términu Mañegu, o mais pequenu dos tres, formaba parti, con términus de Vilamel i Trevellu, da pruvincia de Salamanca hasta o anu 1833 []
      This San Martinese locality, the smallest of the three, formed, along with the Vilamen and Trevejo localities, the Salamanca province until the year 1833 []

French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin dorsum. Compare Romansch dies and Romanian dos (from Vulgar Latin *dossum).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

dos m ‎(plural dos)

  1. (anatomy) back (of a person)
  2. (in the plural) backs (of persons)
  3. backstroke

Antonyms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

External links[edit]


Galician[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From contraction of preposition de ‎(of, from) + masculine plural definite article os ‎(the). Akin to Portuguese dos (de + os).

Contraction[edit]

dos m pl ‎(masculine do, feminine da, feminine plural das)

  1. of the; from the

Irish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Irish doss ‎(bush, thicket, tree).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

dos m ‎(genitive singular dois, nominative plural dosanna)

  1. tuft

Declension[edit]

Mutation[edit]

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
dos dhos ndos
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Ladino[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin duos, accusative of duo.

Numeral[edit]

dos ‎(Latin spelling, Hebrew spelling דוס)

  1. (cardinal) two

Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Indo-European *déh₃tis. Cognate with Ancient Greek δόσις ‎(dósis).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

dōs f ‎(genitive dōtis); third declension

  1. dowry
  2. gift, endowment, talent

Inflection[edit]

Third declension.

Number Singular Plural
nominative dōs dōtēs
genitive dōtis dōtum
dative dōtī dōtibus
accusative dōtem dōtēs
ablative dōte dōtibus
vocative dōs dōtēs

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]


Latvian[edit]

Verb[edit]

dos

  1. 3rd person singular future indicative form of dot
  2. 3rd person plural future indicative form of dot

Malaccan Creole Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Portuguese dois, from Latin duōs, masculine accusative of duo.

Numeral[edit]

dos

  1. (cardinal) two

Malay[edit]

Noun[edit]

dos

  1. dose

Middle Welsh[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

dos

  1. second-person singular imperative of mynet

Norman[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French dos, from Vulgar Latin *dossum, from Latin dorsum.

Noun[edit]

dos m ‎(plural dos)

  1. (Jersey, anatomy) back (of a person)

Old French[edit]

Noun[edit]

dos m ‎(oblique plural dos, nominative singular dos, nominative plural dos)

  1. (anatomy) back

Descendants[edit]

  • French: dos
  • Norman: dos (Jersey)

Portuguese[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Contraction[edit]

dos

  1. Contraction of de os ‎(pertaining or relating to the).; of the; from the (masculine plural)
    dos Santos
    of the Saints

Quotations[edit]

For usage examples of this term, see Citations:do.

See also[edit]

  • do (singular form)
  • das (feminine form)
  • da (singular feminine form)

Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Vulgar Latin dossum, from Latin dorsum. Compare French dos and Romansch dies.

Noun[edit]

dos n (plural dosuri)

  1. (anatomy) back
  2. (anatomy) bottom, behind, buttocks
  3. reverse
  4. backside, rear
  5. tails (on a coin)

Synonyms[edit]

  • (back): spate
  • (bottom, behind, buttocks): fund

Spanish[edit]

Spanish cardinal numbers
 <  1 2 3  > 
    Cardinal : dos
    Ordinal : segundo
    Multiplier : doble

Etymology[edit]

From Latin duōs, accusative of duo, from Proto-Indo-European *dwóh₁. Cognates include Ancient Greek δύο ‎(dúo), Old English twa (English two), Persian دو.

Pronunciation[edit]

Cardinal numeral[edit]

dos

  1. (cardinal) two

Related terms[edit]


Swedish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

dos c

  1. dose (of medication)

Walloon[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Vulgar Latin *dossum, from Latin dorsum.

Noun[edit]

dos m

  1. (anatomy) back

Welsh[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

dos

  1. (literary, North Wales) second-person singular imperative of mynd

Synonyms[edit]

  • cer (South Wales)

Mutation[edit]

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
dos ddos nos unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.