Reconstruction:Proto-Italic/staēō

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This Proto-Italic entry contains reconstructed words and roots. As such, the term(s) in this entry are not directly attested, but are hypothesized to have existed based on comparative evidence.

Proto-Italic[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Indo-European *sth₂éh₁ye-, from the root *steh₂- + stative suffix *-éh₁yeti. The formation corresponds exactly with Proto-Slavic *stojěti.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

*staēō[1][2]

  1. stand

Inflection[edit]

Inflection of *staēō (second conjugation stative)
Present *staēō
Perfect *stetai
Past participle *statos
Present indicative Active Passive
1st sing. *staēō *staēōr
2nd sing. *staēs *staēzo
3rd sing. *staēt *staētor
1st plur. *staēmos *staēmor
2nd plur. *staētes *staēm(e?)n(ai?)
3rd plur. *staēnt *staēntor
Present subjunctive Active Passive
1st sing. *staēām *staēār
2nd sing. *staēās *staēāzo
3rd sing. *staēād *staēātor
1st plur. *staēāmos *staēāmor
2nd plur. *staēātes *staēām(e?)n(ai?)
3rd plur. *staēānd *staēāntor
Perfect indicative Active
1st sing. *stetai
2nd sing. *stetistai
3rd sing. *stete(d)
1st plur. *stetomos
2nd plur. *stetistes
3rd plur. *stetēri
Present imperative Active Passive
2nd sing. *staē *staēzo
2nd plur. *staēte
Future imperative Active
2nd + 3rd sing. *staētōd
Participles Present Past
*staēnts *statos
Verbal nouns tu-derivative s-derivative
*statum *staēzi

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

The sequence of vowels generally contracted in the various Italic languages. However, they contracted differently in different languages, and sometimes also in different forms. In Latin, all forms show the contraction -aē- > -ā-, but this did apparently not happen in Oscan and Umbrian where the vowels are clearly attested uncontracted. The first-person singular present indicative does show -aēō > -aō- in all languages, which is then followed by a further contraction -aō > in Latin (similar to the verbs of the first conjugation).

References[edit]

  1. ^ De Vaan, Michiel (2008) Etymological Dictionary of Latin and the other Italic Languages (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 7), Leiden, Boston: Brill
  2. ^ Sihler, Andrew L. (1995) New Comparative Grammar of Greek and Latin, Oxford, New York: Oxford University Press, →ISBN