stour

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See also: Stour

English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English stoor, stour ‎(large, powerful), from Old English stōr ‎(large, great, strong, violent), from Proto-Germanic *stōraz, *stōrijaz ‎(great, big, strong), from Proto-Indo-European *stār-, *stōr- ‎(big, thick, old). Akin to Scots stour ‎(tall, large, great, stout), Saterland Frisian stor ‎(great, many), Low German stur ‎(large), Danish and Swedish stor ‎(large, great), Icelandic stórr ‎(large, tall), Polish stary ‎(old, ancient) and probably Albanian shtoj ‎(I add, increase). Compare also stoor, steer.

Alternative forms[edit]

Adjective[edit]

stour ‎(comparative more stour, superlative most stour)

  1. (now rare outside dialects) Tall; large; stout.
  2. (now rare outside dialects) Strong; powerful; hardy; robust; sturdy.
    O stronge lady stoor, what doest thou?--Chaucer.
  3. (now rare outside dialects) Bold; audacious.
  4. (now rare outside dialects) Rough in manner; stern; austere; ill-tempered.
  5. (now rare outside dialects, of a voice) Rough; hoarse; deep-toned; harsh.
  6. (now rare outside dialects, of land or cloth) Stiff; inflexible.
Derived terms[edit]

Adverb[edit]

stour ‎(comparative more stour, superlative most stour)

  1. (Now chiefly dialectal) Severely; strongly.

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English stoure, stourre, from Old Norse staurr ‎(a stake, pale), from Proto-Germanic *stauraz ‎(pole, support), from Proto-Indo-European *stā- ‎(to stand, place). Cognate with Icelandic staur ‎(a stake, pole), Ancient Greek σταυρός ‎(staurós, a stake, cross).

Noun[edit]

stour ‎(plural stours)

  1. A stake.
  2. A round of a ladder.
  3. A stave in the side of a wagon.
  4. A large pole by which barges are propelled against the stream; a poy.

Etymology 3[edit]

From Middle English stour, stor ‎(conflict) from Anglo-Norman estur ‎(conflict, struggle), from Old French estour, estor, estorme, estourmie, estormie ‎(battle, assault, conflict, tumult), from Frankish *sturm ‎(storm, commotion, battle), from Proto-Germanic *sturmaz ‎(storm). Akin to Old High German sturm ‎(battle, storm). More at storm.

Noun[edit]

stour ‎(plural stours)

  1. (obsolete) An armed battle or conflict.
    • 1485, Sir Thomas Malory, Le Morte d'Arthur, Book V:
      Then there began a passyng harde stoure, for the Romaynes ever wexed ever bygger.
    • 1600, Edward Fairfax, The Jerusalem Delivered of Tasso, XII, xv:
      This pair, who past have many a dreadful stour, / And proffer now to prove this venture stout, / Alone to this attempt let them go forth, / Alone than thousands of more price and worth.
  2. (obsolete) A time of struggle or stress.
  3. (now dialectal) Tumult, commotion; confusion.
  4. (Britain dialectal) A blowing or deposit of dust; dust in motion or at rest.

Verb[edit]

stour ‎(third-person singular simple present stours, present participle stouring, simple past and past participle stoured)

  1. Alternative form of stoor

Anagrams[edit]


Middle English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Adjective[edit]

stour

  1. large