mór

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Hungarian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin Maurus (a Moor, meaning a Mauritanian, an inhabitant of Mauritania), from Ancient Greek Μαῦρος (Maûros), also via German Mohr.[1]

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

mór (not comparable)

  1. Moorish (of or relating to the Moors or their culture)

Declension[edit]

Inflection (stem in -o-, back harmony)
singular plural
nominative mór mórok
accusative mórt mórokat
dative mórnak móroknak
instrumental mórral mórokkal
causal-final mórért mórokért
translative mórrá mórokká
terminative mórig mórokig
essive-formal mórként mórokként
essive-modal
inessive mórban mórokban
superessive móron mórokon
adessive mórnál móroknál
illative mórba mórokba
sublative mórra mórokra
allative mórhoz mórokhoz
elative mórból mórokból
delative mórról mórokról
ablative mórtól móroktól
non-attributive
possessive - singular
móré móroké
non-attributive
possessive - plural
móréi mórokéi

Noun[edit]

mór (plural mórok)

  1. Moor

Declension[edit]

Inflection (stem in -o-, back harmony)
singular plural
nominative mór mórok
accusative mórt mórokat
dative mórnak móroknak
instrumental mórral mórokkal
causal-final mórért mórokért
translative mórrá mórokká
terminative mórig mórokig
essive-formal mórként mórokként
essive-modal
inessive mórban mórokban
superessive móron mórokon
adessive mórnál móroknál
illative mórba mórokba
sublative mórra mórokra
allative mórhoz mórokhoz
elative mórból mórokból
delative mórról mórokról
ablative mórtól móroktól
non-attributive
possessive - singular
móré móroké
non-attributive
possessive - plural
móréi mórokéi
Possessive forms of mór
possessor single possession multiple possessions
1st person sing. mórom mórjaim
2nd person sing. mórod mórjaid
3rd person sing. mórja mórjai
1st person plural mórunk mórjaink
2nd person plural mórotok mórjaitok
3rd person plural mórjuk mórjaik

References[edit]

  1. ^ Zaicz, Gábor. Etimológiai szótár: Magyar szavak és toldalékok eredete (’Dictionary of Etymology: The origin of Hungarian words and affixes’). Budapest: Tinta Könyvkiadó, 2006, →ISBN   (See also its second, revised, expanded edition published in 2021: →ISBN)

Further reading[edit]

  • mór in Bárczi, Géza and László Országh: A magyar nyelv értelmező szótára (’The Explanatory Dictionary of the Hungarian Language’). Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó, 1959–1962. Fifth ed., 1992: →ISBN

Icelandic[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mór m (genitive singular mós, nominative plural móar)

  1. (also in plural) moor, heath
    Synonyms: mói, mólendi
  2. (uncountable) peat

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Irish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Irish mór, már, from Proto-Celtic *māros, from Proto-Indo-European *moh₁ros.

Cognate with Old Welsh maur (Welsh mawr, Cornish maur), Breton meur; Ancient Greek -μωρος (-mōros, great, famed) (ἐγχεσί-μωρος (enkhesí-mōros, great in spear-throwing)), Old High German māri (famed), German Märchen (a tale), Old Norse mærr (famous), Proto-Slavic *měrъ (Vladimir, etc.), Latin merus, English mere.

Adjective[edit]

mór (genitive singular masculine móir, genitive singular feminine móire, plural móra, comparative )

  1. big, large, great
Declension[edit]
Antonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old Irish móraid, máraid, from Proto-Celtic *mārāti.

Verb[edit]

mór (present analytic mórann, future analytic mórfaidh, verbal noun móradh, past participle mórtha) (transitive, intransitive)

  1. magnify; exalt, extol
  2. increase
  3. (literary, of festival) celebrate
  4. (with as) boast about
  5. (with ar) begrudge to
Conjugation[edit]
Synonyms[edit]

Mutation[edit]

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
mór mhór not applicable
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

References[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Old Irish[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Celtic *māros (compare Welsh mawr), from Proto-Indo-European *moh₁ros.

Compare Old High German māri (famous, great) and perhaps the element -μωρος (-mōros) in Ancient Greek ἐγχεσίμωρος (enkhesímōros, mighty with the spear), ἰόμωροι (iómōroi, boasting), σινάμωρος (sinámōros, mischievous, hurtful), ὑλακόμωρος (hulakómōros, always barking).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

mór (equative móir, comparative móu, móo)

  1. big, great
    • c. 800, Würzburg Glosses on the Pauline Epistles, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1987, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. I, pp. 499–712, Wb. 10c21
      Ba torad sa⟨í⟩thir dúun in chrud so ce du·melmis cech túari et ce du·gnemmis a ndu·gníat ar céli, act ní bad nertad na mbráithre et frescsiu fochricce as móo.
      It would be a fruit of labor for us in this way if we consumed every food and if we did what our fellows do, but it would not be a strengthening of the brothers and a hope of a greater reward.
    • c. 800, Würzburg Glosses on the Pauline Epistles, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1987, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. I, pp. 499–712, Wb. 26d19
      Is mór in dethiden file domsa diibsi.
      Great is the solicitude that I have for you.
    • c. 800–825, Diarmait, Milan Glosses on the Psalms, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1987, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. I, pp. 7–483, Ml. 55d11
      Amal du·berad nech hi ceist do Dauid: “Húare is móir sléb⟨e⟩ fírinne Dǽ, cid ara fodmai-siu, ⟨a⟩ Dauid, didiu a ndu imnedaib ⁊ frithoircnib fodaimi? Air it fírián-⟨s⟩u.” Ícaid-som didiu anísin, a n-as·mbeir iudicia Domini abisus multa .i. ataat mesai Dǽ nephchomtetarrachti amal abis ⁊ amal fudumain. Is ed in sin fod·era in n-erígim, cid ara fodaim int aís fírián inna fochaidi, ⁊ cid ara mbiat in pecthaig isnaib soinmechaib.
      As though someone had put as a question to David: “Because God’s righteousness is as great as a mountain, why then, David, dost thou suffer what of afflictions and injuries thou sufferest? For thou art righteous.” He solves that then when he says “iudicia Domini abyssus multa”, i.e. there are judgments of God incomprehensible like an abyss and like a depth. That is what causes the complaint why the righteous folk endure tribulations, and why sinners are in prosperity.

Declension[edit]

o/ā-stem
Singular Masculine Feminine Neuter
Nominative mór mór mór
Vocative móir*
mór**
Accusative mór móir
Genitive móir móire móir
Dative mór móir mór
Plural Masculine Feminine/neuter
Nominative móir móra
Vocative móru
móra
Accusative móru
móra
Genitive mór
Dative móraib
Notes *modifying a noun whose vocative is different from its nominative

**modifying a noun whose vocative is identical to its nominative
† not when substantivized

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Irish: mór
  • Manx: mooar
  • Scottish Gaelic: mòr

Noun[edit]

mór n

  1. a large amount, a large number; much, many (with the modified noun in the genitive)
    mór fínamuch wine
    (lit. "a large amount of wine")
    mór fermany men
    (lit. "a large number of men")

Inflection[edit]

Neuter o-stem
Singular Dual Plural
Nominative mórN
Vocative mórN
Accusative mórN
Genitive móirL
Dative mórL
Initial mutations of a following adjective:
  • H = triggers aspiration
  • L = triggers lenition
  • N = triggers nasalization

Verb[edit]

·mór

  1. third-person singular preterite conjunct of móraid

Mutation[edit]

Old Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Nasalization
mór
also mmór after a proclitic
mór
pronounced with /ṽ(ʲ)-/
unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further reading[edit]


Old Norse[edit]

Noun[edit]

mór m (genitive mós, plural móar)

  1. a moor, a heath, a barren moorland

Declension[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Icelandic: mór
  • Norwegian Nynorsk: mo
  • Norwegian Bokmål: mo

References[edit]

  • mór in A Concise Dictionary of Old Icelandic, G. T. Zoëga, Clarendon Press, 1910, at Internet Archive.

Polish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *morъ, from Proto-Indo-European *mer-.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mór m inan

  1. (dated) plague, murrain

Declension[edit]

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • mór in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • mór in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Portuguese[edit]

Adjective[edit]

mór (invariable, comparable)

  1. Obsolete spelling of mor

Scottish Gaelic[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

mór (comparative and superlative forms motha, also )

  1. Dated form of mòr.