Róm

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See also: rom, Rom, ROM, rơm, rom., and Rom.

Faroese[edit]

Faroese Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia fo

Pronunciation[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

Róm f

  1. Rome (the capital city of Italy)

Declension[edit]

Singular
Indefinite
Nominative Róm
Accusative Róm
Dative Róm
Genitive Rómar

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]


Icelandic[edit]

Icelandic Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia is

Pronunciation[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

Róm f

  1. Rome (the capital city of Italy)

Declension[edit]

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Old Irish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin Rōma.

Pronunciation[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

Róm f (genitive Rómae)

  1. Rome (the ancient capital of the Roman Empire; capital city of the Papal States)
    • c. 845, St. Gall Glosses on Priscian, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1975, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. II, pp. 49–224, Sg. 148a6
      For·comnacair buith a maicc-som hí Róim.
      His son happened to be in Rome.
    • c. 845, St. Gall Glosses on Priscian, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1975, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. II, pp. 49–224, Sg. 174a1
      .i. ind Róm fil hí Constantinopoil. Ar ro·hucad airechas inna Rómae co Constantinopoil, rucad dano aainmm.
      i.e. the Rome that is in Constantinople. Because the Roman Empire was brought to Constantinople, its name was thus brought with it.
    • c. 895–901, Vita tripartita Sancti Patricii, published in Bethu Phátraic: The tripartite life of Patrick (1939, Hodges, Figgis), edited and with translations by Kathleen Mulchrone, line 1707
      "Ní maith a ndu·gní," ol Pátraic. "Día léicthe dam-sa congbáil súnd, roba[d] tánaise Romae Letha cona Tibir tréthi, mo chathir-se cona Ess Rúaid trea, ⁊ robad do chland-su betis comarpai indi.
      "What you're doing isn't good." said Patrick. "If you let me have a settlement here, my city, with its Ess Rúaid [flowing] through it, could have been a second Rome in Latium with its Tiber [flowing] through it, and it would be your children who would be my successors therein."

Inflection[edit]

Feminine ā-stem
Singular Dual Plural
Nominative RómL
Vocative RómL
Accusative RóimN
Genitive RómaeH
Dative RóimL
Initial mutations of a following adjective:
  • H = triggers aspiration
  • L = triggers lenition
  • N = triggers nasalization

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Middle Irish: Róim

Slovak[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Romani rrom, probably ultimately from Sanskrit डोम (ḍoma, member of a low caste of travelling musicians and dancers in Kashmir).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

Róm m (genitive singular Róma, nominative plural Rómovia, genitive plural rómov, declension pattern of chlap)

  1. A Romani; a member of the Roma/Romani people.
    Synonyms: cigán, Cigán

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]