lurch

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See also: Lurch

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Originally a nautical term, possibly from French lacher (to let go).

Noun[edit]

lurch (plural lurches)

  1. A sudden or unsteady movement.
    the lurch of a ship, or of a drunkard
    • 1898, J. Meade Falkner, Moonfleet Chapter 4
      Yet I hoped by grouting at the earth below it to be able to dislodge the stone at the side; but while I was considering how best to begin, the candle flickered, the wick gave a sudden lurch to one side, and I was left in darkness.
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

lurch (third-person singular simple present lurches, present participle lurching, simple past and past participle lurched)

  1. To make such a sudden, unsteady movement.
Translations[edit]

See also[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Latin lurcāre.

Verb[edit]

lurch (third-person singular simple present lurches, present participle lurching, simple past and past participle lurched)

  1. (obsolete) To swallow or eat greedily; to devour; hence, to swallow up.
    • 1625, Francis Bacon, Of Building
      Too far off from great cities, which may hinder business; too near them, which lurcheth all provisions, and maketh everything dear.

Etymology 3[edit]

From French lourche (deceived, embarrassed; also the name of a game), from Proto-West Germanic *lort (left; left-handed; crooked; bent; warped; underhanded; deceitful; limping).[1] Cognate to English lirt.

Noun[edit]

lurch (countable and uncountable, plural lurches)

  1. An old game played with dice and counters; a variety of the game of tables.
  2. A double score in cribbage for the winner when his/her adversary has not yet pegged their 31st hole.
    • August 14, 1784, Horace Walpole, letter to the Hon. H. S. Conway
      Lady Blandford has cried her eyes out on losing a lurch.

Verb[edit]

lurch (third-person singular simple present lurches, present participle lurching, simple past and past participle lurched)

  1. (obsolete, transitive) To leave someone in the lurch; to cheat.
    • 1692–1717, Robert South, Twelve Sermons Preached upon Several Occasions, volume (please specify |volume=I to VI), 6th edition, London: [] J[ames] Bettenham, for Jonah Bowyer, [], published 1727, OCLC 21766567:
      Never deceive or lurch the sincere communicant.
  2. (obsolete, intransitive) To rob.
  3. (obsolete, intransitive) To evade by stooping; to lurk.
  4. (transitive) To defeat in the game of cribbage with a lurch (double score as explained under noun entry).

References[edit]

  1. ^ Arika Okrent (2019-07-05), “12 Old Words That Survived by Getting Fossilized in Idioms”, in Mental Floss[1], Pocket, retrieved 2021-10-08

Anagrams[edit]