week

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to: navigation, search

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English weke, from Old English wice, wucu ‎(week), from Proto-Germanic *wikǭ ‎(turn, succession, change, week), from Proto-Indo-European *weyg-, *weyk- ‎(to bend, wind, turn, yield). Related to Proto-Germanic *wīkaną ‎(to bend, yield, cease). The Dutch noun derives from a related verb *waikwaz ‎(to yield), via the current Dutch form wijken ‎(to cede, give way).

Cognate with Saterland Frisian Wiek, West Frisian wike, Dutch week, German Woche, Danish uge, Norwegian Nynorsk veke, Swedish vecka, Icelandic vika, Gothic 𐍅𐌹𐌺𐍉 ‎(wikô, turn for temple service), Latin vicis. Related also to Old English wīcan ‎(to yield, give way), English weak.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia

week ‎(plural weeks)

  1. Any period of seven consecutive days.
    • 2013 July 6, “The rise of smart beta”, The Economist, volume 408, number 8843, page 68:
      Investors face a quandary. Cash offers a return of virtually zero in many developed countries; government-bond yields may have risen in recent weeks but they are still unattractive. Equities have suffered two big bear markets since 2000 and are wobbling again. It is hardly surprising that pension funds, insurers and endowments are searching for new sources of return.
  2. A period of seven days beginning with Sunday or Monday.
  3. A subdivision of the month into longer periods of work days punctuated by shorter weekend periods of days for markets, rest, or religious observation such as a sabbath.
  4. Seven days after (sometimes before) a specified date.
    I'll see you Thursday week.

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

See also[edit]

External links[edit]

Statistics[edit]

Most common English words before 1923: German · seven · notice · #week: 778 · week · stone · tree

Afrikaans[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Dutch week, from Middle Dutch weke, from Old Dutch *wika, from Proto-Germanic *wikǭ, from Proto-Indo-European *weyg- ‎(to bend, wind, turn, yield). Compare English week, West Frisian wike, German Woche.

Noun[edit]

week ‎(plural weke)

  1. week
    Daar is sewe dae in die week.‎ ― There are seven days in the week.

Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle Dutch weke, from Old Dutch *wika, from Proto-Germanic *wikǭ, from Proto-Indo-European *weyg- ‎(to bend, wind, turn, yield). Related to wijken.

Compare English week, West Frisian wike, German Woche.

Noun[edit]

week f ‎(plural weken, diminutive weekje n)

  1. week
Derived terms[edit]
Descendants[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle Dutch weec, from Old Dutch *wēk, from Proto-Germanic *waikwaz.

Compare English weak, West Frisian weak, German weich.

Adjective[edit]

week ‎(comparative weker, superlative weekst)

  1. soft, tender, fragile
  2. weak, gentle, weakhearted
Declension[edit]
Inflection of week
uninflected week
inflected weke
comparative weker
positive comparative superlative
predicative/adverbial week weker het weekst
het weekste
indefinite m./f. sing. weke wekere weekste
n. sing. week weker weekste
plural weke wekere weekste
definite weke wekere weekste
partitive weeks wekers
Derived terms[edit]
Antonyms[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

Verb[edit]

week

  1. first-person singular present indicative of weken
  2. imperative of weken

Verb[edit]

week

  1. singular past indicative of wijken

Anagrams[edit]