wik

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See also: Wik

Chuukese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowing from English week.

Noun[edit]

wik

  1. week

Iwam[edit]

Noun[edit]

wik

  1. woman

References[edit]

  • transnewguinea.org, citing D. C. Laycock, Languages of the Lumi Subdistrict (West Sepik District), New Guinea (1968), Oceanic Linguistics, 7 (1): 36-66

Old Saxon[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Germanic *wīk-, from Latin vicus(village), from Proto-Indo-European *wéyḱs(village, household). Cognate with Ancient Greek οἶκος(oîkos), Albanian vis(place, land, country), Gothic 𐍅𐌴𐌹𐌷𐍃(weihs). Closer cognate with Old Frisian wīk, Old English wīc (English wick), Dutch wijk, Old High German wīh (German Weichbild). Replaced earlier Proto-Germanic *wīhsą(village, settlement) of the same Proto-Indo-European root.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

wīk f

  1. settlement, village, dwelling

Descendants[edit]


Tok Pisin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English week.

Noun[edit]

wik

  1. week
    • 1989, Buk Baibel long Tok Pisin, Bible Society of Papua New Guinea, Genesis 2:3 (translation here):
      Na God i tambuim de namba 7 na em i tok olsem de namba 7 bilong olgeta wik em i bikpela de bilong em yet, long wanem, em i wokim pinis olgeta samting na long dispela de em i malolo.
This entry has fewer than three known examples of actual usage, the minimum considered necessary for clear attestation, and may not be reliable. Tok Pisin is subject to a special exemption for languages with limited documentation. If you speak it, please consider editing this entry or adding citations. See also Help and the Community Portal.

Wadjiginy[edit]

Noun[edit]

wik

  1. water

References[edit]

  • Darrell T. Tryon, An introduction to Maranungku (Northern Australia) (1970) (quoted online in ASJP)