wik

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See also: Wik

Choctaw[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English week.

Noun[edit]

wīk (alienable)

  1. week

Chuukese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from English week.

Noun[edit]

wik

  1. week

Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ʋɪk/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɪk

Verb[edit]

wik

  1. inflection of wikken:
    1. first-person singular present indicative
    2. imperative

Iwam[edit]

Noun[edit]

wik

  1. woman

References[edit]

  • transnewguinea.org, citing D. C. Laycock, Languages of the Lumi Subdistrict (West Sepik District), New Guinea (1968), Oceanic Linguistics, 7 (1): 36-66

Middle English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old English wicce.

Adjective[edit]

wik

  1. Alternative form of wikke

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old English wēoce.

Noun[edit]

wik

  1. Alternative form of weke (wick)

Nigerian Pidgin[edit]

Noun[edit]

wik

  1. week

Old Saxon[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-West Germanic *wīk, from Latin vīcus, from Proto-Indo-European *weyḱ-.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

wīk f

  1. settlement, village, dwelling

Descendants[edit]

  • Middle Low German: wîk

Tok Pisin[edit]

This entry has fewer than three known examples of actual usage, the minimum considered necessary for clear attestation, and may not be reliable. Tok Pisin is subject to a special exemption for languages with limited documentation. If you speak it, please consider editing this entry or adding citations. See also Help and the Community Portal.

Etymology 1[edit]

From English week.

Noun[edit]

wik

  1. week
    • 1989, Buk Baibel long Tok Pisin, Port Moresby: Bible Society of Papua New Guinea, Jenesis 2:3:
      Na God i tambuim de namba 7 na em i tok olsem de namba 7 bilong olgeta wik em i bikpela de bilong em yet, long wanem, em i wokim pinis olgeta samting na long dispela de em i malolo.
      →New International Version translation

Etymology 2[edit]

From English wick.

Noun[edit]

wik

  1. wick

Etymology 3[edit]

From English weak.

Adjective[edit]

wik

  1. weak

Wadjiginy[edit]

Noun[edit]

wik

  1. water

References[edit]

  • Darrell T. Tryon, An introduction to Maranungku (Northern Australia) (1970) (quoted online in ASJP)

Yola[edit]

Noun[edit]

wik

  1. Alternative form of wick

References[edit]

  • Jacob Poole (1867), William Barnes, editor, A Glossary, With some Pieces of Verse, of the old Dialect of the English Colony in the Baronies of Forth and Bargy, County of Wexford, Ireland, London: J. Russell Smith, page 78