wik

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Chuukese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowing from English week.

Noun[edit]

wik

  1. week

Old Saxon[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Germanic *wīk-, from Latin vicus ‎(village), from Proto-Indo-European *wéyḱs ‎(village, household). Cognate with Ancient Greek οἶκος ‎(oîkos), Albanian vis ‎(place, land, country), Gothic 𐍅𐌴𐌹𐌷𐍃 ‎(weihs). Closer cognate with Old Frisian wīk, Old English wīc (English wick), Dutch wijk, Old High German wīh (German Weichbild). Replaced earlier Proto-Germanic *wīhsą ‎(village, settlement) of the same Proto-Indo-European root.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

wīk f

  1. settlement, village, dwelling

Descendants[edit]

  • Middle Low German: wîk

Tok Pisin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English week.

Noun[edit]

wik

  1. week
    • 1989, Buk Baibel long Tok Pisin, Bible Society of Papua New Guinea, Genesis 2:3 (translation here):
      Na God i tambuim de namba 7 na em i tok olsem de namba 7 bilong olgeta wik em i bikpela de bilong em yet, long wanem, em i wokim pinis olgeta samting na long dispela de em i malolo.
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