bakke

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to: navigation, search

Danish[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Norse bakki ‎(bank).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /bakə/, [ˈb̥ɑɡ̊ə]

Noun[edit]

bakke c (singular definite bakken, plural indefinite bakker)

  1. hill, rise, slope
Inflection[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle Low German bak, back or Middle Dutch bak, from Medieval Latin bacca ‎(basin, bowl)

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /bakə/, [ˈb̥ɑɡ̊ə]

Noun[edit]

bakke c (singular definite bakken, plural indefinite bakker)

  1. tray, salver
Inflection[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

From German Backe.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /bakə/, [ˈb̥ɑɡ̊ə]

Noun[edit]

bakke c (singular definite bakken, plural indefinite bakker)

  1. jaw (of a tool)
Inflection[edit]

Etymology 4[edit]

From English back

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /bakə/, [ˈb̥ɑɡ̊ə]

Verb[edit]

bakke ‎(imperative bak, infinitive at bakke, present tense bakker, past tense bakkede, past participle har bakket)

  1. back

Dutch[edit]

Verb[edit]

bakke

  1. (archaic) singular present subjunctive of bakken

Anagrams[edit]


Middle English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Probably a corruption of Old Swedish nattbakka, likely related to Old English nihtwacu ‎(night watch), replacing Old English hrēremūs, perhaps later rhymed with rat or cat, two animals with with good night vision.

Noun[edit]

bakke

  1. bat (flying mammal)

Alternative forms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]


Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse bakki

Noun[edit]

bakke m ‎(definite singular bakken, indefinite plural bakker, definite plural bakkene)

  1. a hill or slope

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse bakki

Noun[edit]

bakke m ‎(definite singular bakken, indefinite plural bakkar, definite plural bakkane)

  1. a hill or slope

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]


West Frisian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

PIE root
*bʰeh₃g-
EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page as described here.

Verb[edit]

bakke

  1. to bake