boor

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See also: Boor and bòòr

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Dutch boer (peasant), ultimately from Proto-Germanic *būraz (dweller, inhabitant). Doublet of Boer and bower (peasant, farmer).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

boor (plural boors)

  1. A peasant.
  2. A Boer, white South African of Dutch or Huguenot descent.
  3. A yokel, country bumpkin.
  4. An uncultured person.
    • c. 1610–1611, William Shakespeare, “The VVinters Tale”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies [] (First Folio), London: [] Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358, [Act V, scene ii], line 155:
      Not swear it, now I am a gentleman? Let boors and franklins say it, I'll swear it.
    • 1905, Edmund Selous, The Bird Watcher in the Shetlands, p. 107 [1]:
      I question if any man ever saw his absent friend more clearly than did Shakespeare his Falstaff, for instance, or Scott his Balfour of Burleigh. But does it, therefore, follow that either of these great writers would, when hungry, have summoned up before him a clearer picture of his approaching dinner, than does the equally hungry or very much hungrier boor? This I doubt; and on the same principle I doubt if the said boor would see his dinner more clearly than a wolf, bear, or tiger would theirs when in quest of it.

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

References[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Afar[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French port.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈboːɾ/
  • Hyphenation: boor

Noun[edit]

bóor m 

  1. port, harbour

References[edit]

  • Mohamed Hassan Kamil (2015) L’afar: description grammaticale d’une langue couchitique (Djibouti, Erythrée et Ethiopie)[1], Paris: Université Sorbonne Paris Cité (doctoral thesis), page 52

Afrikaans[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Dutch boor, from Middle Dutch bore

Noun[edit]

boor (plural bore, diminutive boortjie)

  1. drill

Etymology 2[edit]

Chemical element
B
Previous: berillium (Be)
Next: koolstof (C)

From Dutch boor, from borium

Noun[edit]

boor (uncountable)

  1. boron
Synonyms[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

From Dutch boren

Verb[edit]

boor (present boor, present participle borende, past participle geboor)

  1. to drill

Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle Dutch bore.

Noun[edit]

boor f (plural boren, diminutive boortje n)

  1. drill
Derived terms[edit]
Descendants[edit]
  • Afrikaans: boor
  • Aukan: boo
  • Caribbean Hindustani: boro
  • Caribbean Javanese: bur
  • Indonesian: bor
  • Papiamentu: bor, boor
  • Sranan Tongo: boro, boor

Etymology 2[edit]

Chemical element
B
Previous: beryllium (Be)
Next: koolstof (C)

Dutchification of borium.

Noun[edit]

boor n (uncountable)

  1. boron
Synonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Related terms[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Verb[edit]

boor

  1. first-person singular present indicative of boren
  2. imperative of boren

Estonian[edit]

Chemical element
B
Previous: berüllium (Be)
Next: süsinik (C)
Estonian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia et

Noun[edit]

boor (genitive boori, partitive boori)

  1. boron

Declension[edit]


Latin[edit]

Verb[edit]

boor

  1. first-person singular present passive indicative of boō

Middle English[edit]

Noun[edit]

boor

  1. Alternative form of bor

Swedish[edit]

Noun[edit]

boor

  1. indefinite plural of boa.

Yola[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English povre, from Old French povre, from Latin pauper.

Adjective[edit]

boor

  1. poor

References[edit]

  • Jacob Poole (1867), William Barnes, editor, A Glossary, With some Pieces of Verse, of the old Dialect of the English Colony in the Baronies of Forth and Bargy, County of Wexford, Ireland, London: J. Russell Smith, page 27