cham

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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See also: Cham, ćham, chấm, châm, Châm, chậm, and Cham.

English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From French cham, from Turkish han (lord, prince) (borrowed into Arabic, Persian, Mongolian etc.).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

cham (plural chams)

  1. Archaic spelling of khan.
    • 1840, Thomas Fuller, The History of the Holy War
      But Baiothnoi, chief captain of the Tartarian army (for they were not admitted to speak with the great cham himself), cried quits with this friar, outvying him with the greatness and divinity of their cham; and sent back by them a blunt letter []
  2. An autocrat or dominant critic, especially Samuel Johnson.
    • 1997: "Sitting at a table, drinking Ale, observing the Mist thro’ the Window-Panes, Mason forty-five, the Cham sixty-four." — Thomas Pynchon, Mason & Dixon
    • 2007: The Tonsons [] would publish Johnson's Shakespeare only by subscription, obliging the Great Cham to sell copies well ahead of publication — Michael Dobson, ‘For his Nose was as sharpe as a Pen’, London Review of Books 29:9, p. 3

Etymology 2[edit]

See chap.

Verb[edit]

cham (third-person singular simple present chams, present participle chamming, simple past and past participle chammed)

  1. (obsolete) To chew.
    • 1531, William Tyndale, Answer to Sir Thomas More's Dialogue
      But he that repenteth toward the law of God, and at the sight of the sacrament, or of the breaking, feeling, eating, chamming, or drinking, calleth to remembrance the death of Christ, his body breaking and blood shedding for our sins [...]

Anagrams[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Vietnamese Chăm, from Eastern Cham Cam.

Adjective[edit]

cham (feminine singular chame, masculine plural chams, feminine plural chames)

  1. Cham

Etymology 2[edit]

From Turkish han (khan).

Noun[edit]

cham m (plural chams)

  1. khan

Further reading[edit]


Irish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

cham

  1. Lenited form of cam.

Mutation[edit]

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
cam cham gcam
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Macanese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Portuguese chão (ground), inherited from Latin plānum (level ground)

Noun[edit]

cham (plural cham-cham)

  1. soil
  2. ground
    Fu-fula semeam na cham di Hoing-GongFlowers picked from the soil of Hong Kong

Middle English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

See ch-.

Verb[edit]

cham

  1. I am

Old Irish[edit]

Adjective[edit]

cham

  1. Alternative spelling of chamm: lenited form of cam.

Polish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

cham m pers

  1. (derogatory) an arrogant, ill-mannered person
    Synonyms: prostak, prymityw
  2. (archaic) peasant; countryman; person of low birth
    Synonym: wieśniak

Declension[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • cham in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Portuguese[edit]

Noun[edit]

cham m (plural chãos)

  1. Obsolete spelling of chão

Scottish Gaelic[edit]

Adjective[edit]

cham

  1. Lenited form of cam.

Mutation[edit]

Scottish Gaelic mutation
Radical Lenition
cam cham
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Tzotzil[edit]

Verb[edit]

cham

  1. (intransitive) to die
    Icham.He/she died.
    Mu me jk'an xicham.[1]
    I do not want to die.
    Synonyms: chʼay, chʼay ikʼ, laj, olan

References[edit]

  1. ^ Laughlin, Robert M. (1977) Of cabagges and kings: tales from Zinacantán. Washington: Smithsonian Institution Press, p. 269.