critic

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See also: crític

English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Middle French critique, from Latin criticus, from Ancient Greek κριτικός (kritikós, of or for judging, able to discern), from κρίνω (krínō, I judge).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (UK, US) IPA(key): /ˈkɹɪt.ɪk/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɪtɪk

Noun[edit]

critic (plural critics)

  1. A person who appraises the works of others.
    • 1911, Thomas Babington Macaulay, “Goldsmith, Oliver”, in 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica:
      The opinion of the most skilful critics was, that nothing finer [than Goldsmith's Traveller] had appeared in verse since the fourth book of the Dunciad.
  2. A specialist in judging works of art.
  3. One who criticizes; a person who finds fault.
    • 1741, Isaac Watts, The Improvement of the Mind
      When an author has many beauties consistent with virtue, piety, and truth, let not little critics exalt themselves, and shower down their ill nature.
  4. An opponent.
  5. Obsolete form of critique (an act of criticism)
  6. Obsolete form of critique (the art of criticism)
    • 1690, John Locke, An Essay Concerning Human Understanding, Chapter 21, page 550
      And, perhaps, if they were distinctly weighed, and duly considered, they would afford us another sort of logic and critic, than what we have been hitherto acquainted with.

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Verb[edit]

critic (third-person singular simple present critics, present participle criticking, simple past and past participle criticked)

  1. (obsolete, transitive, intransitive) To criticise.
    • 1607, Antony Brewer (attributed), Lingua, or the Combat of the Five Senses for Superiority
      Nay, if you begin to critic once, we shall never have done.

Anagrams[edit]


Irish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from English critique, from French critique, from New Latin critica (critique).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

critic f (genitive singular critice, nominative plural criticí)

  1. critique
    Synonym: beachtaíocht
  2. criticism
    Synonym: criticeas, léirmheastóireacht

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Mutation[edit]

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
critic chritic gcritic
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further reading[edit]

  • "critic" in Foclóir Gaeilge–Béarla, An Gúm, 1977, by Niall Ó Dónaill.
  • Entries containing “critic” in New English-Irish Dictionary by Foras na Gaeilge.

Ladin[edit]

Adjective[edit]

critic m pl

  1. masculine plural of critich

Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from French critique and Latin criticus.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

critic m (plural critici)

  1. critic

Adjective[edit]

critic m or n (feminine singular critică, masculine plural critici, feminine and neuter plural critice)

  1. critical

Declension[edit]