boar

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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See also: Boar, boâr, bôar, bóar, and -boar

English[edit]

Sus scrofa (1)
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Etymology[edit]

From Middle English bor, boor, from Old English bār, from Proto-Germanic *bairaz.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

boar (plural boars or boar)

  1. A wild boar (Sus scrofa), the wild ancestor of the domesticated pig.
  2. A male pig.
  3. A male boar (sense 1).
  4. A male bear.
  5. A male guinea pig.

Coordinate terms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

See also[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Dutch boer

Noun[edit]

boar m (definite singular boaren, indefinite plural boarar, definite plural boarane)

  1. (historical) a Boer

Related terms[edit]

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Romanian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Vulgar Latin, Late Latin bovārius or boārius (cow herder), from Latin bovārius, boārius (of cattle), from bōs. Equivalent to bou +‎ -ar. Compare Aromanian buyear, French bouvier, Italian boaro, Portuguese boieiro, Spanish boyero.

Noun[edit]

boar m (plural boari)

  1. cowherd

Related terms[edit]

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West Frisian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun[edit]

boar c (plural boaren, diminutive boarke)

  1. drill, bore

Further reading[edit]

  • boar”, in Wurdboek fan de Fryske taal (in Dutch), 2011

Yola[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Uncertain. Maybe from Middle English bor.

Noun[edit]

boar

  1. hedgehog

References[edit]

  • Jacob Poole (1867) , William Barnes, editor, A glossary, with some pieces of verse, of the old dialect of the English colony in the baronies of Forth and Bargy, County of Wexford, Ireland, J. Russell Smith, →ISBN