baron

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See also: Baron, báron, barón, and bâron

English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English baroun, in turn borrowed from Old French baron, Medieval Latin barō (not to be confused with classical bārō (simpleton)), possibly from Frankish *barō (servant, man, warrior), perhaps from *barô (carrier), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰer- (to bear). Possibly cognate with Old English beorn (man, warrior). Used in early Germanic law in the sense of homō (man, human being).

A Celtic origin has also been suggested, due to the occurrence of a Latin barones (servos militum) as early as the first century (Cornutus, On Persius' Fifth Satire). OED takes this hypothetical Proto-Celtic *bar- (hero) to be a figment.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

baron (plural barons, feminine baroness)

  1. The male ruler of a barony.
  2. A male member of the lowest rank of English nobility (the equivalent rank in Scotland is lord).
    Coordinate terms: don, duke, earl, lord, prince, baronet
  3. (by extension) A person of great power in society, especially in business and politics.
    Synonyms: magnate, tycoon; see also Thesaurus:important person
    • c. 1948, George Orwell, Such, Such Were the Joys:
      There were a few exotics among them — some South American boys, sons of Argentine beef barons, one or two Russians, and even a Siamese prince, or someone who was described as a prince.
    • 2013 August 10, Lexington, “Keeping the mighty honest”, in The Economist[1], volume 408, number 8848:
      British journalists shun complete respectability, feeling a duty to be ready to savage the mighty, or rummage through their bins. Elsewhere in Europe, government contracts and subsidies ensure that press barons will only defy the mighty so far.
  4. (Britain, prison slang) A prisoner who gains power and influence by lending or selling tobacco.
    • 1960, Hugh J. Klare, Anatomy of Prison (page 33)
      The first thing a baron does is to accumulate a supply of tobacco. He spends every penny he can earn on laying it in []
    • 1961, Peter Baker, Time out of life (page 51)
      Nevertheless, from my own agonies of the first few months, after which I did not miss smoking at all, I could appreciate the need of others. It was in this atmosphere of craving that the 'barons' thrived. Barons are prisoners who lend tobacco.
    • 1980, Leonard Michaels, Christopher Ricks, The State of the Language (page 525)
      In British prisons tobacco still remains the gold standard which is made to back every transaction and promise. The official allowance is barely sufficient for individual smoking needs, but tobacco may expensively be borrowed or bought from a baron, possibly through his runner.
  5. A baron of beef, a cut made up of a double sirloin.
    • 1851, Herman Melville, Moby-Dick, chapter 34
      Such portentous appetites had Queequeg and Tashtego, that to fill out the vacancies made by the previous repast, often the pale Dough-Boy was fain to bring on a great baron of salt-junk, seemingly quarried out of the solid ox.
  6. Any of various nymphalid butterflies of the genus Euthalia.
  7. (law, obsolete) A husband.
    Coordinate term: wife
    baron and femehusband and wife

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

References[edit]

  • "baron n.", Oxford English Dictionary, Second edition, 1989; first published in New English Dictionary, 1885.

Anagrams[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Readjustment from earlier baroen through French influence, from Middle Dutch baroen, from Old French baron, from Frankish *barō.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

baron m (plural baronnen, diminutive baronnetje n, feminine barones)

  1. baron

Derived terms[edit]


Esperanto[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

baron

  1. accusative singular of baro

French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle French baron, from Old French baron, from or corresponding to Late Latin or Medieval Latin barō, barōnem, possibly from Frankish *baro (freeman) or of other Germanic origin; alternatively, of ultimately Celtic origin.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

baron m (plural barons)

  1. (dated) baron, lord, noble landowner

Further reading[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Javanese[edit]

Other scripts
Carakan ꦧꦫꦺꦴꦤ꧀
Roman baron

Etymology 1[edit]

baru +‎ -an

Noun[edit]

baron (krama-ngoko baron)

  1. young plant, especially coffee

Etymology 2[edit]

Borrowed from Dutch baron (baron).

Noun[edit]

baron (krama-ngoko baron)

  1. a title for European noblemen

References[edit]

  • "baron" in W. J. S. Poerwadarminta, Bausastra Jawa. J. B. Wolters' Uitgevers-Maatschappij N. V. Groningen, Batavia, 1939

Middle French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French baron.

Noun[edit]

baron m (plural barons)

  1. baron (nobleman)

Descendants[edit]

  • French: baron

Norman[edit]

Noun[edit]

baron m (plural barons)

  1. Alternative form of bâron

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse barrún, Old French baron and Old High German baro

Noun[edit]

baron m (definite singular baronen, indefinite plural baroner, definite plural baronene)

  1. a baron

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nn

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse barrún, Old French baron and Old High German baro

Noun[edit]

baron m (definite singular baronen, indefinite plural baronar, definite plural baronane)

  1. a baron

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]


Old Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *bazōną

Verb[edit]

baron

  1. to reveal, to make public

Inflection[edit]

This verb needs an inflection-table template.

Descendants[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • baron”, in Oudnederlands Woordenboek, 2012

Old French[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From or corresponding to Medieval Latin bārō, possibly from Frankish *barō (freeman) or of other Germanic origin; alternatively, ultimately of Celtic origin. The nominative form ber corresponds to the nominative barō.

Noun[edit]

baron m (oblique plural barons, nominative singular ber, nominative plural baron)

  1. lord, baron (title of nobility)
  2. (by extension) husband

Synonyms[edit]

Descendants[edit]


Polish[edit]

Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pl

Etymology[edit]

From French baron, from Middle French baron, from Old French baron, from or corresponding to Late Latin or Medieval Latin barō, barōnem.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

baron m pers (feminine baronowa)

  1. baron, lord

Declension[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • baron in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • baron in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French baron.

Noun[edit]

baron m (plural baroni)

  1. baron

Declension[edit]


Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French baron

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /bǎroːn/
  • Hyphenation: ba‧ron

Noun[edit]

bàrōn m (Cyrillic spelling ба̀ро̄н)

  1. baron (title of nobility)

Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French baron

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

baron c (feminine: baronessa)

  1. a baron, a ruler of a barony

Declension[edit]

Declension of baron 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative baron baronen baroner baronerna
Genitive barons baronens baroners baronernas

Anagrams[edit]