varón

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See also: varon and váron

Galician[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Galician and Old Portuguese baron (13th century), further origin uncertain.[1] First attested as Medieval Latin baro in the 5th century Salian Law meaning "man". It appears as such in other Germanic laws (as barus in Alemannic ones) and is later glossed by Isidore (Or. 9.4.31) as "mercenary soldier". The original meaning could have been "man", especially in relation to some one else, as in "the king's man," passing on one side into "servant, vassal," on another into "man as opposed to slave, freeman," also as opposed to wife "husband," as opposed to female "male."[2] It could derive:

Doublet of barón. Cognate to Portuguese varão, Spanish barón and varón, French baron, Italian barone.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

varón m (plural varóns)

  1. man (adult male human)
    • 13th century, Antonio López Ferreiro (ed.), Fueros municipales de Santiago y de su tierra. Madrid: Ediciones Castilla, p. 699:
      aquel pecado escumungado que fazen os barones unos con outros
      that excommunicated sin that men do with one another
    • c1295, Ramón Lorenzo (ed.), La traducción gallega de la Crónica General y de la Crónica de Castilla. Ourense: I.E.O.P.F,, page 814:
      ca esta (he) muy boa et nobre rreyna dona Berĩguela co[m] tamana aguça gardou sempre este fillo et llj meteu no curaçõ feyto de obras de piedade de ome barõ, mãçebo et nino, et todo linagẽ de omes -esto he barõ et moller-
      because this very noble and excellent queen, Lady Berenguela, with great care protected her son and put in his heart acts of piety of adult man, young man and boy, and of all the lineage of men - that is, man and woman -

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ “A globalized history of “baron,” part 2”, in OUPblog[1], 2014-06-18, retrieved 2021-02-09
  2. ^ Oxford English Dictionary, 1884–1928, and First Supplement, 1933.

Further reading[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Origin uncertain.[1] First attested as Medieval Latin baro in the 5th century Salian Law, meaning "man". It appears as such in other Germanic laws (as barus in Alemannic ones) and is later glossed by Isidore (Or. 9.4.31) as "mercenary soldier". The original meaning could have been "man", especially in relation to some one else, as in "the king's man," passing on one side into "servant, vassal," on another into "man as opposed to slave, freeman," also as opposed to wife "husband," as opposed to female "male."[2] It could derive:

Doublet of barón. Cognate to Portuguese varão, Galician varón and barón, French baron, Italian barone.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

varón m (plural varones)

  1. person of male sex
    Synonyms: hombre, macho
    Antonym: hembra
    un estudiante varóna male student
    • 1882, José Zorrilla, chapter IX, in La leyenda del Cid:
      Y es: que entonces un varón / poderoso, desterrado / por su Rey, se iba a otro Estado / a servir a otra nación.
      (please add an English translation of this quote)

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ “A globalized history of “baron,” part 2”, in OUPblog[2], 2014-06-18, retrieved 2021-02-09
  2. ^ Oxford English Dictionary, 1884–1928, and First Supplement, 1933.

Further reading[edit]