magnes

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See also: magnés and mágnes

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Latin

Noun[edit]

magnes

  1. Obsolete form of magnet.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Edmund Spenser to this entry?)
    • 1592, G[abriel] H[arvey], “[Greene’s Memorial; or Certain Funeral Sonnets.] Sonnet XVII. His Exhortation to Atonement and Love.”, in Fovre Letters, and Certaine Sonnets, Especially Touching Robert Greene, and Other Parties by Him Abused: but Incidently of Diuers Excellent Persons, and Some Matters of Note. To All Courteous Mindes, that will Voutchsafe the Reading, London: Imprinted by Iohn Wolfe, OCLC 84013514; republished as Four Letters, and Certain Sonnets, Especially Touching Robert Greene, and Other Parties by Him Abused: But Incidentally of Divers Excellent Persons, and Some Matters of Note. To All Courteous Minds that will Vouchsafe the Reading, London: From the private press of Longman, Hurst, Rees, Orme, and Brown; printed by T[homas] Davison, Whitefriars, London, [1814], OCLC 220598379, page 64:
      Magnes and many things attractive are, / But nothing so allective under skies, / As that same dainty amiable star, / That none but grisly mouth of hell defies.

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.
(See the entry for magnes in
Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.)

Anagrams[edit]


French[edit]

Verb[edit]

magnes

  1. second-person singular present indicative of magner
  2. second-person singular present subjunctive of magner

Anagrams[edit]


Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Ancient Greek μαγνήτης λίθος (magnḗtēs líthos, Magnesian stone), after Lydian city Magnesia ad Sipylum (modern-day Manisa, Turkey), named after the Greek region of Μαγνησία (Magnēsía), whence came the colonist who founded it. In ancient times the city was a primary source of mysterious stones that could attract or repel each other, which were eventually named after it.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

magnēs f (genitive magnētis); third declension

  1. magnet, lodestone

Inflection[edit]

Third declension, alternative accusative singular in -im, alternative ablative singular in and accusative plural in -īs.

Case Singular Plural
nominative magnēs magnētēs
genitive magnētis magnētium
dative magnētī magnētibus
accusative magnētem
magnētim
magnētēs
magnētīs
ablative magnēte
magnētī
magnētibus
vocative magnēs magnētēs

Adjective[edit]

magnēs (genitive magnētis); third declension

  1. magnetic

Inflection[edit]

Third declension.

Number Singular Plural
Case / Gender Masc./Fem. Neuter Masc./Fem. Neuter
nominative magnēs magnētēs magnētia
genitive magnētis magnētium
dative magnētī magnētibus
accusative magnētem magnēs magnētēs magnētia
ablative magnētī magnētibus
vocative magnēs magnētēs magnētia

References[edit]

  • magnes in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • magnes in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • magnes” in Félix Gaffiot’s Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette (1934)
  • magnes in The Perseus Project (1999) Perseus Encyclopedia[1]
  • magnes in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • magnes in William Smith, editor (1848) A Dictionary of Greek Biography and Mythology, London: John Murray

Polish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

magnes m inan

  1. magnet

Declension[edit]

See also[edit]