cub

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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See also: Cub, CUB, cúb, and чуб

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (UK) IPA(key): /kʌb/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ʌb

Etymology 1[edit]

From earlier cubbe. Origin unknown. According to Pokorny, from Proto-Germanic *kubb-, from Proto-Indo-European *gup- (round object, knoll), from *gew- (to bend, curve, arch, vault).[1]

Compare Icelandic and Old Norse kobbi (seal), Old Irish cuib (whelp).[2] Compare also English cob.

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

a cub.

cub (plural cubs)

  1. A young fox.
  2. (by extension) The young of certain other animals, including the bear, wolf, lion and tiger.
  3. (humorous or derogatory) A child, especially an awkward, rude, ill-mannered boy.
  4. (slang) A young man who seeks relationships with older women, or "cougars".
    Jason is only 15 and his girlfriend is 23, he's quite a cub.
  5. (obsolete) A stall for cattle.
  6. Synonym of cub reporter
    • 1978, The Journalism Quarterly (volume 55, page 652)
      Swain has interviewed 67 reporters on 16 metropolitan dailies in 10 cities — from cubs to veterans — who talk candidly []
    • 2018, Randall S. Sumpter, Before Journalism Schools
      [] from competing publications and the editors of publications that might buy freelance material from cubs.
  7. (furry fandom) An adolescent furry character.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Verb[edit]

cub (third-person singular simple present cubs, present participle cubbing, simple past and past participle cubbed)

  1. To give birth to cubs.
  2. To hunt fox cubs.
    • 1943, Stuart Palmer, The Puzzle of the Silver Persian
      He knew that, only a few hours from London, the Hunt was cubbing over his ancestral and much-mortgaged acres, while his own horse ate its head off in a stable.
  3. (obsolete) To shut up or confine.

Etymology 2[edit]

Noun[edit]

cub (plural cubs)

  1. Acronym of cashed up bogan.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Pokorny, Julius (1959) Indogermanisches etymologisches Wörterbuch [Indo-European Etymological Dictionary] (in German), Bern, München: Francke Verlag, page 393-398
  2. ^ Douglas Harper (2001–2022), “cub”, in Online Etymology Dictionary.

Anagrams[edit]


Albanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From South Slavic; compare Serbo-Croatian ćȕba ‘tuft, crest’, Polish czub ‘crest; tip’.[1] Mann posits that the noun might be from Gothic 𐌸𐌹𐌿𐍆𐍃 (þiufs), although this is unlikely.[2]

Adjective[edit]

cub m (feminine cube)

  1. bobtailed, having a docked tail
  2. awnless (of grain)

Derived terms[edit]

Noun[edit]

cub m (indefinite plural cuba, definite singular cubi, definite plural cubat)

  1. mountain bandit, robber, brigand, highwayman
  2. (figuratively) crazy hero, crazy fool

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Orel, Vladimir (1998), “cub”, in Albanian Etymological Dictionary, Leiden, Boston, Cologne: Brill, →ISBN, page 48
  2. ^ S. E. Mann, “The Indo-European Vowels in Albanian”, Language 26 (1950): 384.

Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin cubus.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

cub m (plural cubs)

  1. cube (regular polyhedron having six square faces)
  2. (mathematics) cube (the third power of a number)

Related terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from French cube, from Latin cubus.

Noun[edit]

cub n (plural cuburi)

  1. cube

Yola[edit]

Etymology[edit]

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun[edit]

cub

  1. A small gull.

References[edit]

  • Jacob Poole (1867), William Barnes, editor, A Glossary, With some Pieces of Verse, of the old Dialect of the English Colony in the Baronies of Forth and Bargy, County of Wexford, Ireland, London: J. Russell Smith, page 32