welp

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See also: Welp

English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Representing well pronounced with the mouth snapped closed at the end (excrescent p)[1]. Compare yep, yup and nope.

Pronunciation[edit]

Interjection[edit]

welp

  1. (slang) Well.
    • 2018 March 25, Adam Rogers, “The Cambridge Analytica Data Apocalypse Was Predicted in 2007”, in Wired[2]:
      “Nuclear power is a dual-use technology. It can be weaponized.” Welp. “It is sort of what we anticipated, that there would be a Three Mile Island moment around data sharing that would rock the research community,” Lazer says.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Katie Kilkenny (2012-11-30), “Where Did the Expression “Welp” Come From?”, in Slate[1]

Anagrams[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle Dutch welp, from Old Dutch welp, from Proto-Germanic *hwelpaz.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

welp m, n (plural welpen, diminutive welpje n)

  1. whelp, young mammal of certain carnivorous species, notably canine pup, bear - or lion cub
  2. human youngster, especially of age group 8-11 in boy scouts

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • M. J. Koenen & J. Endepols, Verklarend Handwoordenboek der Nederlandse Taal (tevens Vreemde-woordentolk), Groningen, Wolters-Noordhoff, 1969 (26th edition) [Dutch dictionary in Dutch]

Middle Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Dutch welp, from Proto-Germanic *hwelpaz.

Noun[edit]

welp n, m

  1. whelp

Inflection[edit]

This noun needs an inflection-table template.

Descendants[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • welp”, in Vroegmiddelnederlands Woordenboek, 2000
  • welp (I)”, in Middelnederlandsch Woordenboek, 1929

Westrobothnian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse hvelpr, from Proto-Germanic *hwelpaz.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

welp m (definite singular welpen, definite plural welpa)

  1. whelp, puppy

Derived terms[edit]

  • welpgau (playful, amusing puppy)

Verb[edit]

welp

  1. to whelp