cachorro

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Portuguese[edit]

cachorros (sense 1)
cachorro (sense 2)

Etymology[edit]

Of uncertain origin[1], perhaps from Basque txakur, with metathesis, or from a Vulgar Latin *cattulus[2], from Latin catulus, and possibly via Spanish cachorro (cub). Compare also Italian cucciolo and Corsican ghjacaru.

Pronunciation[edit]

 

Noun[edit]

cachorro m (plural cachorros, feminine cachorra, feminine plural cachorras)

  1. (Portugal) puppy (a young dog)
  2. (Brazil, Madeira, colloquial) dog (of any age)
  3. (Brazil, derogatory) a promiscuous man
  4. (by extension) an unfaithful man
  5. Short for cachorro-quente: hot dog

Usage notes[edit]

In Brazil, this is the neutral and colloquial term for "dog", whereas in settings of higher formalities cão is used instead. The feminine cachorra is even more avoided in such settings (in which cadela is used), but is used more often in everyday language.

Derived terms[edit]

Synonyms[edit]

References[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Probably from Vulgar Latin *cattulus (whelp, puppy), from Latin catŭlus (puppy).[1][2][3]

Or, from or influenced by a metathesis of Basque txakur, xakur (puppy);[4] however, this has been dismissed as speculative.[5] Compare with Italian cucciolo.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /kaˈt͡ʃoro/, [kaˈt͡ʃo.ro]

Noun[edit]

cachorro m (plural cachorros, feminine cachorra, feminine plural cachorras)

  1. puppy
    Synonym: perrito
  2. cub (the young of certain other animals, generally mammals)
  3. pup (young of foxes, seals or sea lions)

Derived terms[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ cachorro”, in Diccionario de la lengua española, Vigésima tercera edición, Real Academia Española, 2014
  2. ^ Roberts, Edward A. (2014) A Comprehensive Etymological Dictionary of the Spanish Language with Families of Words based on Indo-European Roots, Xlibris Corporation, →ISBN
  3. ^ cachorro” in Dicionário Aberto based on Novo Diccionário da Língua Portuguesa de Cândido de Figueiredo, 1913
  4. ^ Spanish in Contact: Issues in Bilingualism. (1996). United States: Cascadilla Press, p. 3
  5. ^ Trask, R. L. (2013). The History of Basque. United Kingdom: Taylor & Francis, p. 416

Further reading[edit]