usque

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Abbreviation of usquebaugh, from Irish uisce beatha (water of life) and Scottish Gaelic uisge beatha (water of life). Compare whisky and obsolete whiskybae.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈʌskweɪ/
    • (file)

Noun[edit]

usque (countable and uncountable, plural usques)

  1. (obsolete) whisky

Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Italic *ū̆skʷe, from Proto-Indo-European *úds-kʷe, from *úd-s (out, outward, genitive) +‎ *-kʷe (and). Cognate with Sanskrit उच्चा (uccā́), Younger Avestan𐬎𐬯𐬗𐬀(usca, up, out), Russian вы- (vy-, out from), Proto-Germanic *ūt, English out.

Pronunciation[edit]

Note: judging from the Romance descendants, it's likely the /u/ was long; Germanic and Slavic also continue the long variant.

Adverb[edit]

ū̆sque (not comparable)

  1. all the way
  2. until, up to (sometimes with "ad")
    • (Can we date this quote?), Latin Vulgate translation of Psalm 71:8;Canadian national motto
      Ā marī ū̆sque ad mare.
      From sea unto sea.
  3. constantly, continuously

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • French: jusque
  • Occitan: duscas

References[edit]

  • De Vaan, Michiel (2008), “ū̆sque”, in Etymological Dictionary of Latin and the other Italic Languages (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 7), Leiden, Boston: Brill, →ISBN, page 646

Further reading[edit]

  • usque”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • usque”, in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • usque in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré latin-français, Hachette
  • Carl Meißner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • the territory of this race extends as far as the Rhine: haec gens pertinet usque ad Rhenum
    • from beginning to end: ab ovo usque ad mala (proverb.)
  • usque in Ramminger, Johann (accessed 16 July 2016) Neulateinische Wortliste: Ein Wörterbuch des Lateinischen von Petrarca bis 1700[2], pre-publication website, 2005-2016