cuco

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Galician[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Galician and Old Portuguese; either onomatopoeic, or from Late Latin cucus or cuccus, or Latin cuculus or Ancient Greek κόκκυξ (kókkux).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

cuco m (plural cucos)

  1. cuckoo (Cuculus canorus)
    Tres avichouchos pasan o mar: a rula, o cuco e o paspallar (proverb)
    Three birdies pass the sea: the turtle dove, the cuckoo and the quail
    Synonym: cuquelo
  2. limpet

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]


Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Portuguese cuco, from Late Latin cucus or cuccus, or Latin cuculus or Ancient Greek κόκκυξ (kókkux).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

cuco m (plural cucos)

  1. cuckoo (the bird)

Spanish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈkuko/, [ˈku.ko]
  • (file)

Etymology 1[edit]

Onomatopoeic; or from Late Latin cucus or cuccus, or Latin cuculus or Ancient Greek κόκκυξ (kókkux).

Noun[edit]

cuco m (plural cucos)

  1. cuckoo
Derived terms[edit]

Adjective[edit]

cuco (feminine cuca, masculine plural cucos, feminine plural cucas)

  1. cute
    Synonym: mono
  2. clever, cunning

Etymology 2[edit]

From Portuguese côco, see more at Spanish Wikipedia.

Noun[edit]

cuco m (plural cucos, feminine cuca, feminine plural cucas)

  1. (folklore) bogeyman (ghost or monster to scare children)
    Synonyms: coco, cuca, cucuy

Further reading[edit]


Venetian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Late Latin cucus or cuccus, or Latin cuculus or Ancient Greek κόκκυξ (kókkux).

Noun[edit]

cuco m (plural cuchi)

  1. cuckoo