ge-

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Afrikaans[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Dutch ge-, from Middle Dutch ge-, ghe-, from Old Dutch gi-, ge-, from Proto-Germanic *ga-, from Proto-Indo-European *ḱóm.

Prefix[edit]

ge-

  1. Used to form the past participle
    Ek het die koek geëet — I have eaten the cake.

Derived terms[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle Dutch ge-, ghe-, from Old Dutch gi-, ge-, from Proto-Germanic *ga-, from Proto-Indo-European *ḱóm.

Cognate with German Low German ge-, Dutch Low Saxon ge-, German ge-, Old English ġe- (obsolete English y-, i-, a-), Gothic 𐌲𐌰- (ga-).

Prefix[edit]

ge-

  1. Used for forming the past participle.
  2. (obsolete, no longer productive) Forms perfective verbs from other verbs with a sense of completeness, or simply as an intensifier.

Etymology 2[edit]

From the prefix above with an 'empty' suffix originating from Old Dutch *-i, from Proto-Germanic *-ją.

Prefix[edit]

ge-

  1. Used with a verb stem to create a neuter uncountable noun referring to an action or its result, seen as a single collective whole. Comparable to English -ing (although that forms countable nouns, as it does in Dutch).
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

Prefix[edit]

ge-

  1. See ge- -te.

See also[edit]



Esperanto[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From German ge- found in many neuter collective nouns.

Prefix[edit]

ge-

  1. (plural only) used with a plural (gendered) noun to indicate both sexes together
  2. (unoffically, by extension) used with a (gendered) noun to indicate unspecified gender
  3. (slang, wordplay) used with a verb to indicate heterosexual activity
    • dormi (to sleep)gedormi (to sleep together (with a member of the opposite sex))

Derived terms[edit]



German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle High German ge-, from Old High German ga-, gi-, from Proto-Germanic *ga-, from Proto-Indo-European *ḱóm. Cognate with Low German ge-, e-, Dutch ge-, Old English ġe- (obsolete English y-, i-, a-), Gothic 𐌲𐌰- (ga-).

Pronunciation[edit]

Prefix[edit]

ge-

  1. Forms collective nouns, almost always neuter gender. Whenever possible, the root vowel is modified as well: Ader/Geäder, Ast/Geäst, Berg/Gebirge, Busch/Gebüsch, Rippe/Gerippe, Stein/Gestein, Strauch/Gesträuch, Wasser/Gewässer, Wolke/Gewölk.
  2. When attached to verbal nouns, forms nouns denoting repetition or coninuation. from All of these nouns are neuter and have no plural. For example: ächzen/Geächze, heulen/Geheule/Geheul, reden/Gerede, seufzen/Geseufze.

Prefix[edit]

ge-

  1. forms past participles of some irregular verbs: essen/gegessen, sehen/gesehen, sprechen/gesprochen. Nouns are frequently made from the past participle.

Derived terms[edit]


Synonyms[edit]

  • ge- -t (for regular verbs and some irregular verbs)
  • -t (for verbs with an unstressed prefix)

Ido[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Esperanto ge-, from German ge-.

Prefix[edit]

ge-

  1. suffix used with the plural to indicate both sexes together
    avi (grandfathers or grandmothers)geavi (grandfathers and grandmothers)

Derived terms[edit]



Limburgish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From earlier gè-, from Middle Dutch ge-, ghe-, from Old Dutch gi-, ge-, from Proto-Germanic *ga-, from Proto-Indo-European *ḱóm. Cognate with Old Saxon gi- (Low German e-, ge-), Dutch ge-, Old English ge-, Gothic 𐌲𐌰- (ga-).

Prefix[edit]

ge-

  1. When used in combination with the suffix -dje, forms neuter collective nouns.
  2. When attached to verbal nouns, forms nouns denoting repetition or continuation. All of these nouns are neuter and have no plural. For example: kalle/gekal.
  3. Forms past participles of verbs: wèrke/gewèrk.
  4. Used as an intensifier for verbs. wèrke/gewèrke.

Old English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *ga-, from Proto-Indo-European *ḱóm. Cognate with Old Frisian ge-, e-, Old Saxon gi-, ge- (Low German e-, ge-), Old Dutch gi-, ge- (Dutch ge-), Old High German ga-, gi- (German ge-), Gothic 𐌲𐌰- (ga-).

Pronunciation[edit]

Prefix[edit]

ġe-

  1. Used as an intensifier for verbs, indicating completeness or perfection.
  2. Forms nouns or adjectives of association or similarity; co-
  3. Forms nouns and verbs with the sense of "result" or "process".
  4. Forms past participles or participle adjectives from verbs.

Descendants[edit]

  • Middle English: ȝe-, i-, y-
    • English: a- (etymology 3), y-, i- (obsolete)

Derived terms[edit]



Old Saxon[edit]

Prefix[edit]

ge-

  1. Alternative form of gi-