consul

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See also: cónsul and cônsul

English[edit]

English Wikipedia has articles on:

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Etymology[edit]

From Latin cōnsul, from con- ‎(with) +‎ salīre ‎(to jump, to leap).[1]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

consul ‎(plural consuls)

  1. (historical) Either of the two heads of government and state of the Roman Republic or the equivalent nominal post under the Roman and Byzantine Empires.
  2. (historical) Any of the three heads of government and state of France between 1799 and 1804.
  3. (obsolete) A count or earl.
  4. (obsolete) A councillor, particularly:
    1. (historical) A member of early modern city councils in southern France and Catalonia.
    2. (historical) An officer of the trading and merchant companies of early modern England.
    3. (historical) An official in various early modern port and trading towns, elected by resident foreign merchants to settle disputes among themselves and to represent them to the local authorities.
  5. (by extension) An official residing in major foreign towns to represent and protect the interests of the merchants and citizens of his or her country.
  6. (obsolete) A counsellor.
    • Shakespeare
      Many of the consuls, raised and met,
      Are at the duke's already.
    • Bible, Job. iii. 14 (Douay version)
      With kings and consuls of the earth.

Synonyms[edit]

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Translations[edit]

See also[edit]

Anagrams[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Oxford English Dictionary, 1st edition: "consul, n." Oxford University Press (Oxford), 1893.

Dutch[edit]

Dutch Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia nl

Dutch Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia nl

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

consul c ‎(plural consuls)

  1. consul (official in foreign country)
  2. (historical) consul (of the Roman Republic)

French[edit]

French Wikipedia has articles on:

Wikipedia fr

Etymology[edit]

Borrowing from Latin cōnsul.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

consul m ‎(plural consuls, feminine consule)

  1. consul, in its various senses.

Synonyms[edit]

  • (early modern councilmen of southern France and Catalonia): échevin; capitoul (Toulouse)

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Latin[edit]

Wikipedia has an article on:

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Latin Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia la

Bas-relief of Flavius Anastasius Paulus Probus Sabinianus Pompeius, consul ad 517, in his robes of office.

Etymology[edit]

From Old Latin consol. Maybe related to the Latin verb cōnsulō but details are not clear.[1]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

cōnsul m ‎(genitive cōnsulis); third declension

  1. consul: either of the two highest-ranking officials of the Roman republic, elected annually
    • 63 BCE, Cicero, Catiline Orations (Latin text and English translations here)
      O tempora, o mores! Senatus haec intellegit, consul videt; hic tamen vivit. Vivit?
      "Shame on the age and on its principles! The senate is aware of these things; the consul sees them; and yet this man lives. Lives!"
  2. a proconsul
  3. the highest magistrate in other states
  4. an epithet of the god Jupiter

Inflection[edit]

Third declension.

Case Singular Plural
nominative cōnsul cōnsulēs
genitive cōnsulis cōnsulum
dative cōnsulī cōnsulibus
accusative cōnsulem cōnsulēs
ablative cōnsule cōnsulibus
vocative cōnsul cōnsulēs

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Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  • consul in Charlton T. Lewis & Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • consul in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • CONSUL” in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition, 1883–1887)
  • consul” in Félix Gaffiot (1934), Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Paris: Hachette.
  • Meissner, Carl; Auden, Henry William (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • to be chosen consul at the elections: comitiis consulem creari
    • to elect a consul: consulem creare
    • to declare a person consul-elect: aliquem consulem declarare (Leg. Agr. 2. 2. 4)
    • to offically proclaim (by the praeco, herald) a man elected consul; to return a man consul: aliquem consulem renuntiare (De Or. 2. 64. 260)
    • twice consul: bis consul
    • consul for the second, third time: iterum, tertium consul
    • consul for the sixth, seventh time: sextum (Pis. 9. 20), septimum consul
    • (ambiguous) the augurs announce an unfavourable sign: augures obnuntiant (consuli) (Phil. 2. 33. 83)
    • (ambiguous) let the consuls take measures for the protection of the state: videant or dent operam consules, ne quid res publica detrimenti capiat (Catil. 1. 2. 4)
    • (ambiguous) to go to Cilicia as pro-consul: pro consule in Ciliciam proficisci
  • consul” in Ramminger, Johann (accessed 16 July 2016) Neulateinische Wortliste: Ein Wörterbuch des Lateinischen von Petrarca bis 1700[2], pre-publication website, 2005-2016
  • consul in William Smith et al., editor (1890) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, London: William Wayte. G. E. Marindin
  1. ^ “console” in: Alberto Nocentini, Alessandro Parenti, “l'Etimologico — Vocabolario della lingua italiana”, Le Monnier, 2010, ISBN 978-88-00-20781-2

Norman[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin cōnsul ‎(consul).

Noun[edit]

consul m ‎(plural consuls)

  1. (Jersey) consul

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