thar

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See also: Thar

English[edit]

Adverb[edit]

thar (not comparable)

  1. Nonstandard form of there.
    • 1849, Dr. M.F. Stephenson, assayor at the Mint at Lumpkin Court House, Dahlonega, Georgia[1]:
      Thar's gold in them thar hills.
    • 1882, James Jackson, Tom Terror, the Outlaw:
      Ar’n’t we thar yet?

Noun[edit]

thar (plural thars)

  1. Alternative spelling of tahr

Anagrams[edit]


Albanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From ther (to cut, slay), with a similar sense development in other IE languages[2].

Verb[edit]

thar (first-person singular past tense thara, participle tharë)

  1. to add ferment (to the milk)
Related terms[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ [1]
  2. ^ A Concise Historical Grammar of the Albanian Language, V.Orel, Koninklijke Brill ,Leiden 2000, p.472

Irish[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Irish tar, dar (across, beyond), from Proto-Celtic *ter, from Proto-Indo-European *tr. Cognate with Welsh tra; Latin trans, English through, Dutch door. Compare Scottish Gaelic thar and Manx harrish.

Pronunciation[edit]

Preposition[edit]

thar (plus dative, triggers no mutation in general references but lenition in qualified or particularized references)

  1. over
    1. above
      thar an teachover the house
    2. over, across
      thar an abhainnacross the river
  2. by, past; through
    thar an dorasthrough the door
  3. beyond
    thar m’eolasbeyond my knowledge
  4. more than
Inflection[edit]
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Verb[edit]

thar

  1. Lenited form of tar.

References[edit]

  • "thar" in Foclóir Gaeilge-Béarla, An Gúm, 1977, by Niall Ó Dónaill.
  • 1 tar, dar” in Dictionary of the Irish Language, Royal Irish Academy, 1913–76.

Middle English[edit]

Determiner[edit]

thar

  1. Alternative form of þeir

References[edit]


Old Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *þar.

Adverb[edit]

thār

  1. there

Descendants[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • thār”, in Oudnederlands Woordenboek, 2012

Old Saxon[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *þar.

Adverb[edit]

thar

  1. there

Scottish Gaelic[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Irish tar, dar (across, beyond), from Proto-Celtic *ter, from Proto-Indo-European *tr. Cognate with Welsh tra; Latin trans, English through, Dutch door. Compare Irish thar.

Preposition[edit]

thar

  1. over, across
    Sheòl sinn thar na mara.We sailed across the sea.
  2. beyond
    Tha sin thar mo chomais.That is beyond my ability.

Usage notes[edit]

  • The genitive case is used after this preposition.

Derived terms[edit]

  • The following prepositional pronouns:
Combining

pronoun

Prepositional

pronoun

Prepositional

pronoun (emphatic)

mi tharam tharamsa
tu tharad tharadsa
e thairis thairis-san
i thairte thairtese
sinn tharainn tharainne
sibh tharaibh tharaibhse
iad tharta thartasan

References[edit]

  • 1 tar, dar” in Dictionary of the Irish Language, Royal Irish Academy, 1913–76.