buisine

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English[edit]

Añafiles en las Cantigas de Alfonso X el Sabio.jpg
Anafil.tif

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Old French buisine, busine (an earlier, Middle English-era borrowing bosyne did not survive into modern English), from Latin būcina. Doublet of buccina and posaune.

Noun[edit]

buisine (plural buisines)

  1. (music, historical) A medieval wind instrument with a very long, straight and slender body, usually made of metal.
    Synonym: herald's trumpet
    Coordinate term: buccina
    • 1823, Archaeologia; Or, Miscellaneous Tracts Relating to Antiquity, page 155:
      It was marvellously great, and shewed such joy and satisfaction that the sound and bruit of their instruments, horns, buisines, and trumpets, were heard even as far as the castle.
    • 1860, John Hewitt, The fourteenth century, page 310:
      The clarion named in the above passages appears to have been a smaller kind of trumpet. The buisine (from buccina) was also a sort of trumpet: it was of a bent form, and made of brass.

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French[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French buisine, from Latin būcina.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

buisine f (plural buisines)

  1. (music instrument, historical) buisine

Further reading[edit]


Old French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin būcina, with a change to stress on the last syllable (influenced by the suffix -īnus).

Noun[edit]

buisine f (oblique plural buisines, nominative singular buisine, nominative plural buisines)

  1. A type of trumpet used in battle.

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