cornu

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to: navigation, search

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Latin

Noun[edit]

cornu (plural cornua)

  1. A horn, or anything shaped like or resembling a horn.

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.
(See the entry for cornu in
Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.)


Aromanian[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Latin cornu. Compare Daco-Romanian corn.

Noun[edit]

cornu n (plural coarni/coarne)

  1. horn

Related terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Latin cornus. Compare Daco-Romanian corn.

Noun[edit]

cornu n (plural cornji)

  1. cornel, European cornel, Cornus mas

Related terms[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin cornūtus.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

cornu (feminine singular cornue, masculine plural cornus, feminine plural cornues)

  1. horned

Related terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Latin[edit]

cornua caprī (horns of a goat)

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Indo-European *ḱorh₂u, *ḱr̥h₂-no-, both from Proto-Indo-European *ḱerh₂- (horn). Cognates include English horn, hirn; Ancient Greek κρᾱνίον (krāníon, skull), κέρας (kéras, horn); Sanskrit शृङ्ग (śṛṅga, horn, tusk). See also cerebrum (brain), cervus (deer).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

cornū n (genitive cornūs); fourth declension

  1. a horn, antler
  2. a tusk
  3. the horns of the moon
  4. an arm or wing of an army
  5. (music) a horn as a musical instrument
  6. any substance like the material of a horn, such as the bill of a bird
  7. the end of a book or scroll, usually made of ivory
  8. (figuratively) power, strength, might

Inflection[edit]

Fourth declension neuter.

Case Singular Plural
nominative cornū cornua
genitive cornūs cornuum
dative cornū cornibus
accusative cornū cornua
ablative cornū cornibus
vocative cornū cornua

Note: The genitive singular is also cornū.

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  • cornu in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • cornu in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • du Cange, Charles (1883), “cornu”, in G. A. Louis Henschel, Pierre Carpentier, Léopold Favre, editors, Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (in Latin), Niort: L. Favre
  • cornu” in Félix Gaffiot’s Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette (1934)
  • cornu in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • cornu in William Smith et al., editor (1890) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, London: William Wayte. G. E. Marindin