negro

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See also: Negro

English[edit]

The term Negro was advanced by American polymath W. E. B. Du Bois.

Etymology[edit]

From Spanish and Portuguese negro ‎(black), from Latin nigrum, masculine accusative case of niger ‎(black), of uncertain origin[1], but possibly from Proto-Indo-European *nókʷts ‎(night).[2]

Adjective[edit]

negro ‎(not comparable)

  1. (dated, now offensive) Relating to the black ethnicity.
    • 1963 April, “Anti-bias Coffee Klatsch: Windy City Interfaith Project Fights Bigotry with Coffee, Cookies and Conversation”, Ebony, volume XVIII, number 6, Chicago, Ill.: Johnson Publishing Company, ISSN 0012-9011, page 67:
      Recently, on a wintry Sunday, some 2,500 white Chicago area residents embarked on a strange safari across the city, determined to do what most of them had never done before—visit a Negro home. Eager to purge themselves of ignorance about the city's "other half," they were participants in Interracial Home Visit Day, a "Coffee Klatsch" co-sponsored by local Catholic, Jewish and Protestant groups in an effort to eliminate racial bigotry and hate.
  2. (dated, now offensive) Black or dark brown in color.

Usage notes[edit]

In the United States of America, the word negro is considered acceptable only in a historical context or in proper names such as the United Negro College Fund. Black, which replaced negro from 1966 onward, or the more recent African-American (from the 1980s), are the preferred alternatives, with neither being categorically preferred as an endonym (self-designation) or by publications.

Before 1966, negro was accepted and in fact the usual endonym – consider The Negro, 1915, by W. E. B. Du Bois – which itself replaced the older colored in the 1920s, particularly under the advocacy of Du Bois (who advocated capitalization as Negro). Following the coinage and rise of Black Power and Black pride in the 1960s, particularly post-1966, the term black became preferred, and negro became offensive; in 1968 negro was still preferred by most as a self-designation, while by 1974 black was preferred; usage by publications followed.[3]

See also discussion at Wikipedia.

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Noun[edit]

negro ‎(plural negroes or negros)

  1. Alternative letter-case form of Negro
    • 1867, Mayne Reid, Quadrupeds: what they are and where found (page 141)
      The negroes believe that its presence has a sanitary effect upon their cattle []

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Synonyms[edit]

(noun):

(adjective and noun):

Hyponyms[edit]

(adjective and noun):

Hypernyms[edit]

(noun):

See also[edit]

Anagrams[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ De Vaan, Michiel (2008) Etymological Dictionary of Latin and the other Italic Languages (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 7), Leiden, Boston: Brill
  2. ^ Watkins, Calvert, ed., The American Heritage Dictionary of Indo-European Roots, 2nd ed., Houghton Mifflin Co., 2000.
  3. ^ When Did the Word Negro Become Taboo? In 1966 or soon thereafter. By Brian Palmer, Slate.com, Jan. 11, 2010

Esperanto[edit]

Noun[edit]

negro ‎(accusative singular negron, plural negroj, accusative plural negrojn)

  1. a Negro
    • 1897 June, A. Kofman, “El Heine: La sklavoŝipo”, Lingvo Internacia, volume 2, number 6-7, page 89:
      “Ses centojn da negroj mi ĉe Senegal
      Akiris je prezo profita,
      Malmola viando, simila al ŝton’,
      La membroj — el ŝtalo forĝita.”
      “600 negros at Senegal I acquired at a profitable price, hard meat, like stone, the members - from steel forged.”

Derived terms[edit]

Hyponyms[edit]


Galician[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin niger

Adjective[edit]

negro m (feminine singular negra, masculine plural negros, feminine plural negras)

  1. black (colour)

See also[edit]

Colors in Galician · cores (layout · text)
     vermello      verde      amarelo      ?      branco
     ?      ?      ?      ?      rosa
     ?      azul      laranxa      gris      ?
     negro      púrpura      castaño, marrón      ?      ciano

Italian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin niger, nigrum.

Adjective[edit]

negro m ‎(feminine singular negra, masculine plural negri, feminine plural negre)

  1. black, coloured

Noun[edit]

negro m ‎(plural negri)

  1. black, coloured

Related terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Old Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin niger, nigrum.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

negro m ‎(plural negros, feminine negra, feminine plural negras)

  1. black

Synonyms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

See also[edit]

Colors in Old Portuguese · coores, colores (layout · text)
     vermello      verde      amarelo      ?      branco
     {{{crimson}}}      ?      ?      ?      rosa
     ?      azur      ?      gris      ?
     negro, preto      cardẽo      castanno      ?      ?

Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Portuguese negro, from Latin niger, nigrum.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

negro m (plural negros, feminine negra, feminine plural negras)

  1. negro

Adjective[edit]

negro ‎(feminine singular negra, masculine plural negros, feminine plural negras, comparable)

  1. black (color)

Related terms[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin niger, nigrum.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • Hyphenation: ne‧gro

Noun[edit]

negro m ‎(plural negros)

  1. the black colour
  2. the black ethnicity

Adjective[edit]

negro m ‎(feminine singular negra, masculine plural negros, feminine plural negras)

  1. black (color)
  2. dirty
  3. sad
  4. clandestine
  5. (Spain) angry

Derived terms[edit]

See also[edit]

Colors in Spanish · colores (layout · text)
     rojo      verde      amarillo      crema      blanco
     carmín, carmesí, carmesín, cremesín, cremesino      magenta      azul-petróleo      lima      rosa
     añil      azul      naranja,
anaranjado
     gris      violeta
     negro      morado      marrón      azur      cian