corgi

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

PIE word
*ḱwṓ

Borrowed from Welsh corgi, a compound of cor (dwarf) (ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *(s)ker- (to cut off)) + gi (the soft mutation of ci (dog), ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *ḱwṓ (dog), perhaps from *peḱ- (livestock; wealth)).[1]

The rare plural form corgwn is borrowed from Welsh corgwn.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

corgi (plural corgis or corgies or (rare) corgwn)

  1. Short for Welsh corgi (a type of herding dog originating from Wales, having a small body, short legs, and fox-like features such as large ears; two separate breeds are recognized: the Cardigan Welsh Corgi and the Pembroke Welsh Corgi).
    • 1966 July 14, S. M. Lampson, “Sturdy Farm Dogs from Wales”, in John Adams, editor, Country Life, volume 140, London: George Newnes [], OCLC 472261612, page 69:
      By this time the Pembrokeshire—the short-tailed corgwn—were increasing in popularity very rapidly. The Cardiganshire variety lagged behind their more numerous cousins, but, even so, almost all the larger shows of this country had classes []
    • 2015 July 27, Katharine Whitehorn, “Need we follow all the news?”, in The Guardian[1], London: Guardian News & Media, ISSN 0261-3077, OCLC 229952407, archived from the original on 9 March 2016:
      [W]hich news item do we have to worry about and have a view on? Not, presumably, the fact that the Queen is going cool on corgies; probably not how space exploration is getting on; townies can maybe skip the fates of either cows or badgers.
    • 2016, Janet Vorwald Dohner, “Herding Dogs”, in Deborah Burns and Lisa H. Hiley, editors, Farm Dogs: A Comprehensive Breed Guide to 93 Guardians, Herders, Terriers, and Other Canine Working Partners, North Adams, Mass.: Storey Publishing, →ISBN, page 200, column 1:
      While larger, longer corgwn with tails were found in the lowland and hill farms of central and northern Cardiganshire, in the south a shorter, lighter corgi was more common.

Usage notes[edit]

  • Some breed authorities prescribe the etymologically consistent Welsh plural form corgwn.[2] Nonetheless, the English plural form corgis is considerably more common.

Alternative forms[edit]

Hyponyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ corgi, n.”, in OED Online Paid subscription required, Oxford, Oxfordshire: Oxford University Press, June 2018; “corgi, n.”, in Lexico, Dictionary.com; Oxford University Press, 2019–present.
  2. ^ For example, see Clifford L. B. Hubbard (1952) The Pembrokeshire Corgi Handbook: Giving the Origin and History of the Breed, Its Show Career, Its Points and Breeding (Dog Lover’s Library Series; no. 8), London: Nicholson & Watson, OCLC 58859451, page 4: “The plural of Corgi is Corgwn and not Corgis.”

Further reading[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English corgi, from Welsh corgi, a compound of cor (dwarf) and ci (dog).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈkɔr.ɡi/
  • Hyphenation: cor‧gi

Noun[edit]

corgi m (plural corgi's)

  1. corgi, Welsh corgi (dog)

Finnish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English corgi, from Welsh corgi, a compound of cor (dwarf) and ci (dog).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈkorɡi/, [ˈko̞rɡi]

Noun[edit]

corgi

  1. corgi, Welsh corgi (dog)

Declension[edit]

Inflection of corgi (Kotus type 5/risti, no gradation)
nominative corgi corgit
genitive corgin corgien
partitive corgia corgeja
illative corgiin corgeihin
singular plural
nominative corgi corgit
accusative nom. corgi corgit
gen. corgin
genitive corgin corgien
partitive corgia corgeja
inessive corgissa corgeissa
elative corgista corgeista
illative corgiin corgeihin
adessive corgilla corgeilla
ablative corgilta corgeilta
allative corgille corgeille
essive corgina corgeina
translative corgiksi corgeiksi
instructive corgein
abessive corgitta corgeitta
comitative corgeineen
Possessive forms of corgi (type risti)
possessor singular plural
1st person corgini corgimme
2nd person corgisi corginne
3rd person corginsa

Synonyms[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English corgi, from Welsh corgi, a compound of cor (dwarf) and ci (dog).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

corgi m (plural corgis)

  1. corgi, Welsh corgi (dog)

Italian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English corgi, from Welsh corgi, a compound of cor (dwarf) and ci (dog).

Noun[edit]

corgi m

  1. corgi, Welsh corgi (dog)

Anagrams[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English corgi, from Welsh corgi, a compound of cor (dwarf) and ci (dog).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈkoɾɡi/, [ˈkoɾ.ɣ̞i]

Noun[edit]

corgi m (plural corgis)

  1. corgi, Welsh corgi (dog)

Derived terms[edit]


Welsh[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From cor (dwarf) +‎ ci (dog) (gi is the soft mutation of ci (dog))

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

corgi m (plural corgwn or corgïaid)

  1. corgi, Welsh corgi (dog)
  2. (sometimes figuratively) cur

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • English: corgi

Mutation[edit]

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
corgi gorgi nghorgi chorgi
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

References[edit]

  • R. J. Thomas, G. A. Bevan, P. J. Donovan, A. Hawke et al., editors (1950–present), “corgi”, in Geiriadur Prifysgol Cymru Online (in Welsh), University of Wales Centre for Advanced Welsh & Celtic Studies