orc

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See also: ORC and Orc

English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
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Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle French orque, Italian orca, and their source, Latin orca (type of whale).

Noun[edit]

orc (plural orcs)

  1. (archaic) Any of several large, ferocious sea creatures, now especially the killer whale. [from 16th c.]
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Savage orc

Probably from Italian orco (man-eating giant); later revived by J. R. R. Tolkien, partly after Old English orc, which he took to mean "demon". Both are from Latin Orcus (the underworld; the god Pluto). Doublet of ogre.

Noun[edit]

orc (plural orcs)

  1. (fantasy, mythology) A mythical evil monstrous humanoid creature, usually quite aggressive and often green. [from 17th c.]
    • 1656, Samuel Holland, Don Zara del Fogo, I.1:
      Who at one stroke didst pare away three heads from off the shoulders of an Orke, begotten by an Incubus.
    • 1834, "The National Fairy Mythology of England" in Fraser's Magazine for Town and Country, Vol. 10, p. 53:
      The chief exploit of the hero, Beowulf the Great, is the destruction of the two monsters Grendel and his mother; both like most of the evil beings in the old times, dwellers in the fens and the waters; and both, moreover, as some Christian bard has taken care to inform us, of "Cain's kin," as were also the eotens, and the elves, and the orcs (eótenas, and ylfe, and orcneas).
    • 1954, JRR Tolkien, The Fellowship of the Ring:
      There was a flash like flame and the helm burst asunder. The orc fell with cloven head.
Hypernyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Descendants[edit]

All are borrowed. Some listed may be semantic loans.

Translations[edit]

See also[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

From Ukrainian орк (ork, evil monstrous humanoid creature; orc), from English orc, and from Russian у́рка (úrka, prison slang for 'criminal') Probably based on Dmitry Puchkov's comedic dubbing of The Lord of the Rings film series, in which the orcs were Russian gangsters.[1] Popularized in English in 2022, following the Russian invasion of Ukraine.

Noun[edit]

orc (plural orcs)

  1. (slang, derogatory, ethnic slur) A Russian soldier or gangster.
    • 2015, Andrew Wilson, The Ukrainians: Unexpected Nation, page 354:
      Ukranians themselves, including those on the right, preferred to call the events the 'Revolution of Dignity', depicted not in terms of ethnicity or class, but in simple civic black and white – a revolution of the people against Yanukovych's 'Mordor' and his 'Orcs'.
    • 2015, Anna Reid, Borderland: A Journey Through the History of Ukraine:
      Least likely to support the People's Republics were the educated middle classes, who were furious with Kiev for failing to nip the insurrection in the bud ('Three babushki with fly-swats could have done it!') and whose whispered nickname for the thugs taking over their streets was 'orcs'.
    • 2022 March 1, Bruno Maçães, “Europe’s Illusion of Peace Has Been Irrevocably Shattered”, in Time:
      And now we must watch the old world go up in flames, in the mad spectacle of Putin’s orcs descending upon Kyiv to execute his macabre plan.
    • 2022 March 1, Vitalii Holich, “Belarusians are urged to escape the occupational units and join Ukrainian Army. Who else fights together with Ukraine against Russia”, in LVIV Now[3]:
      Together with the Chechen volunteer battalion named after Dzhokhar Dudaev, the Belarusian unit of «Azov» is one of the first foreign units fighting for Ukraine against the Russian orcs.
    • 2022 March 16, “The "orcs" have damaged 28 religious buildings in 6 regions of Ukraine - State Service for Ethnic Policy”, in Religious Information Service of Ukraine[4]:
      (see title)
    • 2022 March 16, Scott, ““I’m afraid for my husband”: Elena Zelenskaya told where she is and how she keeps in touch with the president”, in Global Happening[5]:
      The twenty-first day of the Russian invasion makes it clear to everyone and everyone that Ukraine will win – it’s only a matter of time, and we have it – we will turn inside out every orc that illegally set foot on our land! With such an army, people and president, we have nothing to fear!
    • 2022 March 18, Irenaeus, “The Degenerate Savagery Of Putin’s Orcs”, in Daily KOS[6]:
      Putin had a free hand butchering people no one in Europe or America gave a crap about, but now Putin has unleashed his Orcs on Europe.
    • 2022 July 25, Michael Wasiura, “Belarusian Exiles Join Ukrainians in Taking Up Arms Against Russia”, in Newsweek[7], retrieved 2022-07-25:
      Plenty of Belarusian exiles have gone to Europe, but if you run West, then the Orcs [a Ukrainian slang term for "Russian soldiers"] will just follow you there. It's better to risk your life as a free person than to keep running.
Translations[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Paton Walsh, Nick (22 June 2003), “Russia's cult video pirate rescripts Lord of the Rings as gangster film”, in The Guardian[1], retrieved 23 May 2022

Anagrams[edit]


Catalan[edit]

Noun[edit]

orc m (plural orcs)

  1. An orc.

Old English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Proto-West Germanic *ork, from Latin orca (cask, butt, tun). Cognate with Old Saxon ork (jug, pitcher).

Noun[edit]

orc m (nominative plural orcas)

  1. cup, tankard
Declension[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Latin Orcus (the underworld; the god Pluto).

Noun[edit]

orc m

  1. hell
  2. a demon
Usage notes[edit]
  • The sense "demon" is uncertain. Two ambiguous occurrences of orc, one in the plural compound word orcneas in Beowulf (singular orcné, where *né means "corpse", as in dryhtné) and the other in a glossary which glosses Latin Orcus as "orc. þyrs hel deofol", have been interpreted to mean "demon" (including by the OED), and Tolkien held this interpretation when he revived the word with a similar sense in modern English, matching some of the Romance descendants of Orcus. However, it has been argued that this is a misunderstanding and that both instances are of the other sense, "hell".[1][2]
Declension[edit]
Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ [2]
  2. ^ Bosworth-Toller lists only the sense "underworld", not "demon", and interprets the glossary entry as "orcþyrs [oþþe] heldeófol" a statement that Orcus is the god/þyrs/deofol of orc ("hell")

Old Irish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Celtic *ɸorkos, from Proto-Indo-European *pórḱos. Cognate with Latin porcus and English farrow.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

orc m

  1. piglet
    Synonym: banb

Declension[edit]

Masculine o-stem
Singular Dual Plural
Nominative orc orcL oircL
Vocative oirc orcL orcuH
Accusative orcN orcL orcuH
Genitive oircL orc orcN
Dative orcL orcaib orcaib
Initial mutations of a following adjective:
  • H = triggers aspiration
  • L = triggers lenition
  • N = triggers nasalization

Mutation[edit]

Old Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Nasalization
orc unchanged n-orc
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]


Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from English orc.

Noun[edit]

orc m (plural orcs)

  1. (fantasy) orc (evil, monstrous humanoid creature)