troll

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See also: Troll, tröll, and trøll

English[edit]

English Wikipedia has articles on:
Wikipedia

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (UK) IPA(key): /tɹəʊl/, /tɹɒl/
  • (US) IPA(key): /tɹoʊl/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -əʊl, -ɒl

Etymology 1[edit]

From Norwegian or Swedish troll or Danish trold, from Old Norse trǫll (witch, mage, conjurer) (compare Icelandic tröll), related to Middle High German trolle (spook, wraith, monster, ogre).[1] From Proto-Germanic *truzlą (a supernatural being; demon; fiend; giant; monster). Norwegian fortrylle (to bewitch), Norwegian and Danish trylle (to conjure) and Swedish trolla (to conjure). Doublet of droll.

Noun[edit]

troll (plural trolls)

  1. (fantasy) A supernatural being of varying size, now especially a grotesque humanoid creature living in caves or hills or under bridges. [from early 17th c.]
    • 1922, Eleanour Sinclair Rohde, The Old English Herbals, page 3:
      In these manuscripts we are again in an atmosphere of eotens and trolls, there are traces of even older terrors, when the first Teuton settlers in Europe struggled with the aborigines who lived in caves[.]
    • 2013 June 8, “Obama goes troll-hunting”, in The Economist, volume 407, number 8839, page 55:
      The solitary, lumbering trolls of Scandinavian mythology would sometimes be turned to stone by exposure to sunlight. Barack Obama is hoping that several measures announced on June 4th will have a similarly paralysing effect on their modern incarnation, the patent troll.
  2. (slang) An ugly person of either sex, especially one seeking sexual experiences.
    • 2007, David Lubar, Hidden Talents:
      The way Torchie had talked about him, I expected him to be some kind of troll. But he could have passed for one of those actors who makes a couple of movies, gets real popular with the girls for a year or two, and then vanishes from sight.
    • 2009, Judy Chicago, ‎Sarah Quinton, ‎Jenni Sorkin, When Women Rule the World: Judy Chicago in Thread:
      In this work, the abject object - a sculpture of a fat, hairy woman - is heartbreakingly comforted by a text that claims the artist's love and desire to protect the 'ugly' troll.
    • 2010, Linda Francis Lee, The Devil in the Junior League:
      She sulked as we returned downstairs, her own more colorful clothes stuffed into her bright green shoulder bag. “I just wish I didn't have to dress like such a troll.”
    • 2011, R.E. Donald, Ice on the Grapevine:
      Sharon had no desire to talk to Alora Magee, but she was happy to get out of her cell and away from that disgusting troll and her irritating voice.
    • 2012, James Classi, Heatseeker, page 26:
      Edwin Baer was an ugly troll of a man. He stood just about five feet, six inches and maybe weighed 140 pounds soaking wet.
    • 2012, Thomas Appleby, Life in the Harsh Lane: The Nine Lives, Mishaps, and Adventures of a No-body, page 186:
      I liked one of the girls, Sarah, but her mate, the troll, was a total bitch from hell, probably because guys only fancied Sarah, so we hung out whilst the troll was obviously scheming how to steal my money.
    • 2014, Rock Rampant, Mauve Flush, page 280:
      So if you're hoping to get a fuck, you'll be out of luck, Hideous hag, You are an ugly troll,
  3. (astronomy, meteorology) Optical ejections from the top of the electrically active core regions of thunderstorms that are red in color that seem to occur after tendrils of vigorous sprites extend downward toward the cloud tops.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English troll (to go about, stroll, roll from side to side), from Old French troller (to quest, to wander) (French trôler), of Germanic origin, ultimately from Proto-Germanic *truzlōną (to lumber), which is probably related to *trudaną (to tread, step on).

Related to Middle High German trollen (to stroll), Middle Low German drullen (to stroll); fishing sense possibly influenced by trawl and/or trail

Verb[edit]

troll (third-person singular simple present trolls, present participle trolling, simple past and past participle trolled)

  1. (intransitive) To saunter. [from late 14th c.]
  2. (intransitive) To trundle, to roll from side to side. [from early 15th c.]
  3. (transitive, figurative) To draw someone or something out, to entice, to lure as if with trailing bait. [from the 1500s]
    • 1906, Thomas William Lawson, “Fools and Their Money: Some After-Claps of Frenzied Finance”, in Everybody's Magazine, volume XIV(5) May 1906, page 690:
      It was necessary to troll them along two years with the hope of employing their usual methods, in order to get them to a place too far from their starting-point for retreat.
  4. (intransitive, fishing, by extension) To fish using a line and bait or lures trailed behind a boat similarly to trawling; to lure fish with bait. [from circa 1600]
    • (Can we date this quote by Bancroft and provide title, author’s full name, and other details?)
      Their young men [] trolled along the brooks that abounded in fish.
  5. (transitive) To angle for with a trolling line, or with a hook drawn along the surface of the water; hence, to allure.
  6. (transitive) To fish in; to try to catch fish from.
    • (Can we date this quote by Goldsmith and provide title, author’s full name, and other details?)
      With patient angle trolls the finny deep.
  7. (slang, intransitive) To stroll about in order to find a sexual partner. [from 20th c.]
    Synonym: cruise
    He spends most of his waking hours trolling on WIRE.
  8. (intransitive, Internet slang) (to post inflammatory material so as) to attempt to lure others into combative argument for purposes of personal entertainment and/or gratuitous disruption, especially in an online community or discussion [from late 20th c.]
  9. (transitive, Internet slang) By extension, to incite anger (including outside of an Internet context); to provoke, harass or annoy.
    • 1994 March 8, “Robert Royar” (username), “OK, here's more on trolling”, in comp.edu.composition, Usenet:
      trolling isn't aimed at newbies. It's aimed at self-important people
Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

troll (plural trolls)

  1. An instance of trolling, especially, in fishing, the trailing of a baited line. [from circa 1600]
  2. (colloquial, Internet slang) A person who provokes others (chiefly on the Internet) for their own personal amusement or to cause disruption. [from late 20th c.]
    Coordinate term: griefer
    • 2014 December 19, “Friday 2 January's best TV”, in The Guardian[1]:
      Katie Hopkins: My Fat Story 9pm, TLC. The professional troll and one-time Apprentice stirrer piles on the pounds in order to shed them in this two-part doc, which feels at times like an overly long This Morning item.
    • 2016 June 8, Quentin Hardy, “How Gaming Helped Launch the Attack of the Internet Trolls”, in New York Times[2]:
      From there, attacking people head-on — though almost always cloaked in anonymity — wasn’t a big leap. And so much more on the internet became like a game, only the score consisted of attention, outrage or approval from like-minded trolls.
    • 2018 October 30, David Streitfeld, “Where Trolls Reigned Free: A New History of Reddit”, in New York Times[3]:
      It was the place you went, shrouded in anonymity, for pornography, hard-core racism, revenge porn, Nazi cheerleading, Jew-baiting, creepshots, fat-shaming, mindless anarchy and pictures of dead kids or of women who had been beaten. If anyone bothered to look, Reddit was proof that on the internet, the trolls were in charge.

Translations[edit]

Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

From Middle English trollen, trollin (to walk, wander). Cognate with Low German trullen (to troll).

Verb[edit]

troll (third-person singular simple present trolls, present participle trolling, simple past and past participle trolled)

  1. (transitive, intransitive, obsolete) To move circularly; to roll; to turn. [from the 15th c.]
    • 1667, John Milton, “Book 10”, in Paradise Lost. A Poem Written in Ten Books, London: Printed [by Samuel Simmons], and are to be sold by Peter Parker [] [a]nd by Robert Boulter [] [a]nd Matthias Walker, [], OCLC 228722708; republished as Paradise Lost in Ten Books: The Text Exactly Reproduced from the First Edition of 1667: [], London: Basil Montagu Pickering [], 1873, OCLC 230729554:
      Of lustful apperence, to sing, to dance,
      To dress, and troule the Tongue, and roule the Eye.
  2. (transitive, obsolete) To send about; to circulate, as a vessel in drinking.
  3. (transitive, intransitive, archaic) To sing the parts of in succession, as of a round, a catch, and the like; also, to sing loudly, freely or in a carefree way. [from the 16th c.]
    • c. 1610-11, William Shakespeare, The Tempest, Act III scene ii[4]:
      [] Will you troll the catch / You taught me but whilere?
    • (Can we date this quote by Hudibras and provide title, author’s full name, and other details?)
      His sonnets charmed the attentive crowd, / By wide-mouthed mortal trolled aloud.
    • 1862, Thomas Oliphant, Nos Galan:
      Troul the ancient Christmas carol.
    • 1883, Howard Pyle, The Merry Adventures of Robin Hood Chapter V
      Next, he opened his stall and spread his meat upon the bench, then, taking his cleaver and steel and clattering them together, he trolled aloud in merry tones: []

Noun[edit]

troll (plural trolls)

  1. The act of moving round; routine; repetition.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Burke to this entry?)
  2. A song whose parts are sung in succession; a catch; a round.
    • (Can we date this quote by Professor Wilson and provide title, author’s full name, and other details?)
      Thence the catch and troll, while "Laughter, holding both his sides," sheds tears to song and ballad pathetic on the woes of married life.
  3. (obsolete) A trolley.
Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]


French[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Swedish troll, from Old Norse troll, from Proto-Germanic *truzlą, from Proto-Indo-European *derǝ-, *drā-.

Noun[edit]

troll m (plural trolls)

  1. troll (mythical being)

Etymology 2[edit]

Borrowed from English troll.

Noun[edit]

troll m (plural trolls)

  1. troll (inflammatory poster on the Internet)
  2. (by extension) The act of trolling.

Further reading[edit]


Italian[edit]

Noun[edit]

troll m (invariable)

  1. troll (grotesque person, Internet troll)

Derived terms[edit]


Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Norwegian Bokmål Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nb
troll

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse trǫll, from Proto-Germanic *truzlą, from Proto-Indo-European *derǝ-, *drā-.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

troll n (definite singular trollet, indefinite plural troll, definite plural trolla or trollene)

  1. troll (supernatural being)

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse trǫll, from Proto-Germanic *truzlą, from Proto-Indo-European *derǝ-, *drā-.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

troll n (definite singular trollet, indefinite plural troll, definite plural trolla)

  1. troll (supernatural being)

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]


Polish[edit]

Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pl

Etymology[edit]

From English troll, from Old Norse trǫll (witch, mage, conjurer).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

troll m anim

  1. troll (supernatural being)
  2. (colloquial, Internet slang) troll

Declension[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • troll in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • troll in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Portuguese[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

troll m (plural trolls)

  1. (fantasy, Norse mythology) troll (large, grotesque humanoid living in caves, hills or under bridges)
  2. (Internet) troll (person who provokes others and causes disruption)

Spanish[edit]

Noun[edit]

troll m (plural trolls)

  1. Alternative spelling of trol

Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse trǫll, from Proto-Germanic *truzlą, from Proto-Indo-European *derǝ-, *drā-.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

troll n

  1. troll (supernatural being)

Declension[edit]

Declension of troll 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative troll trollet troll trollen
Genitive trolls trollets trolls trollens

See also[edit]