troll

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English[edit]

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Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Norwegian, Danish or Swedish troll, from Old Norse trǫll (witch, mage, conjurer) (compare Icelandic tröll), possibly related to the Middle High German trolle (spook, wraith, monster, ogre) [1]. Norwegian fortrylle (to bewitch), Norwegian and Danish trylle (to conjure) and Swedish trolla (to conjure).

Noun[edit]

troll (plural trolls)

  1. (fantasy) A supernatural being of varying size, now especially a grotesque humanoid creature living in caves or hills or under bridges. [from early 17th c.]
    • 2013 June 8, “Obama goes troll-hunting”, The Economist, volume 407, number 8839, page 55: 
      The solitary, lumbering trolls of Scandinavian mythology would sometimes be turned to stone by exposure to sunlight. Barack Obama is hoping that several measures announced on June 4th will have a similarly paralysing effect on their modern incarnation, the patent troll.
  2. (slang) An ugly person of either sex, especially one seeking sexual experiences.
  3. (astronomy, meteorology) Optical ejections from the top of the electrically active core regions of thunderstorms that are red in color that seem to occur after tendrils of vigorous sprites extend downward toward the cloud tops.
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English troll (to go about", "to stroll", "to roll from side to side), from Old French troller (French trôler) and Middle High German trollen (to stroll); fishing sense possibly influenced by trawl and/or trail

Verb[edit]

troll (third-person singular simple present trolls, present participle trolling, simple past and past participle trolled)

  1. (intransitive) To saunter. [from late 14th c.]
  2. (intransitive) To trundle, to roll from side to side. [from early 15th c.]
  3. (transitive, figuratively) To draw someone or something out, to entice, to lure as if with trailing bait. [from the 1500s]
    1906: It was necessary to troll them along two years with the hope of employing their usual methods, in order to get them to a place too far from their starting-point for retreat.Thomas William Lawson, "Fools and Their Money: Some After-Claps of Frenzied Finance", Everybody's Magazine XIV(5) May 1906, p. 690
  4. (intransitive, fishing, by extension) To fish using a line and bait or lures trailed behind a boat similarly to trawling; to lure fish with bait. [from circa 1600]
    • Bancroft
      Their young men [] trolled along the brooks that abounded in fish.
  5. (transitive) To angle for with a trolling line, or with a hook drawn along the surface of the water; hence, to allure.
  6. (transitive) To fish in; to try to catch fish from.
    • Goldsmith
      With patient angle trolls the finny deep.
  7. (slang, intransitive) To stroll about in order to find a sexual partner, to cruise (originally homosexual slang). [from 20th c.]
    His favorite place to troll is that bar on 42nd street.
    I am trolling for custom, said the actress to the bishop.
  8. (intransitive, Internet slang) In an online community or discussion, (to post inflammatory material so as) to attempt to lure others into combative argument for purposes of personal entertainment and/or gratuitous disruption. [from late 20th c.]
  9. (transitive, Internet slang) By extension, to incite anger (outside of an internet context); to provoke, harass or annoy.
Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

troll (plural trolls)

  1. An instance of trolling, especially, in fishing, the trailing of a baited line. [from circa 1600]
  2. (colloquial) A person who provokes others (chiefly on the Internet) for their own personal amusement or to cause disruption. [from late 20th c.]
Translations[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Related terms[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

From Middle English trollen, trollin (to walk, wander). Cognate with Low German trullen (to troll).

Verb[edit]

troll (third-person singular simple present trolls, present participle trolling, simple past and past participle trolled)

  1. (transitive, intransitive, obsolete) To move circularly; to roll; to turn. [from the 15th c.]
    • Milton
      to dress and troll the tongue, and roll the eye
  2. (transitive, obsolete) To send about; to circulate, as a vessel in drinking.
    • Gammer Gurton's Needle
      Then doth she troll to the bowl.
    • Sir Walter Scott
      Troll the brown bowl.
  3. (transitive, intransitive, archaic) To sing the parts of in succession, as of a round, a catch, and the like; also, to sing loudly, freely or in a carefree way. [from the 16th c.]
    • Shakespeare
      Will you troll the catch?
    • Hudibras
      His sonnets charmed the attentive crowd, / By wide-mouthed mortal trolled aloud.
    Troll the ancient Yuletide carol. Fa la la la la la la la la.

Noun[edit]

troll (plural trolls)

  1. The act of moving round; routine; repetition.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Burke to this entry?)
  2. A song whose parts are sung in succession; a catch; a round.
    • Professor Wilson
      Thence the catch and troll, while "Laughter, holding both his sides," sheds tears to song and ballad pathetic on the woes of married life.
  3. (obsolete) A trolley.
Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Bokmål- og nynorskordboka, Universitetet i Oslo

French[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Borrowing from Old Norse troll.

Noun[edit]

troll m (plural trolls)

  1. troll (mythical being)

Etymology 2[edit]

Borrowing from English troll.

Noun[edit]

troll m (plural trolls)

  1. troll (inflammatory poster on the Internet)

Italian[edit]

Noun[edit]

troll m (invariable)

  1. troll (grotesque person, Internet troll)

Derived terms[edit]


Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

troll n (definite singular trollet; indefinite plural troll; definite plural trolla/trollene) troll n

  1. troll (supernatural being)

Derived terms[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

troll n (definite singular trollet, indefinite plural troll, definite plural trolla) troll n

  1. troll (supernatural being)

Spanish[edit]

Noun[edit]

troll m (plural trolls)

  1. Alternative spelling of trol.

Swedish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

troll n

  1. troll (supernatural being)

Declension[edit]

See also[edit]